August 23, 2018

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula has become increasing popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  In part 1 we summarized how High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) works.  In part 2, we will discuss the main indications for its use in adult and pediatric patients.

August 23, 2018

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula has become increasing popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  In part 1 we summarized how High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) works.  In part 2, we will discuss the main indications for its use in adult and pediatric patients.

August 20, 2018

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has become increasingly popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  I first started using it as a pediatric intensive care fellow, but had little knowledge of how it actually worked.  I noticed a few years after using it successfully in children, mainly with severe bronchiolitis, that we began to use it in the adult intensive care unit as well.  It seems over the past several years many studies have come out reviewing the mechanisms of action as well as its use in a variety of conditions.  In this part we will summarize how it works and for part 2 we will discuss the main indications for its use in adult and pediatric patients.

July 2, 2018

Refractory HypoxemiaNow maybe you have intubated a patient secondary to hypoxemic respiratory failure who is at high risk for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). These patients, and really all patients, with exception of severe obstructive disease, I set up the ventilator to deliver 6mL/kg based on ideal body weight (not actual weight). Regardless if this is a pediatric or adult patient, I am setting up the ventilator to target 6 mL/kg of IBW. I can accomplish this with either pressure mode, where you set the pressure, but closely monitor the tidal volumes the patient is receiving.

July 2, 2018

Refractory HypoxemiaNow maybe you have intubated a patient secondary to hypoxemic respiratory failure who is at high risk for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). These patients, and really all patients, with exception of severe obstructive disease, I set up the ventilator to deliver 6mL/kg based on ideal body weight (not actual weight). Regardless if this is a pediatric or adult patient, I am setting up the ventilator to target 6 mL/kg of IBW. I can accomplish this with either pressure mode, where you set the pressure, but closely monitor the tidal volumes the patient is receiving.