February 17, 2020

Background: In REBEL Cast Episode 73, Anand Swaminathan and I discussed two recent studies on the safety of peripheral vasopressors from two large trials [1][2]. An email from good friend Rory Spiegel brought my attention to yet another trial on this topic [3]. I think we can all agree that in patients with septic shock, or shock in general, the administration of vasopressor agents early, can help to stabilize patients and reverse end-organ hypoperfusion.  Traditionally, this has been done through central venous catheters (CVCs) due to the hypothetical risk of extravasation injury to extremities.  The flip side of this is, that central venous catheters are not without their own risks and time to place them can delay a therapy that may benefit patients.

February 13, 2020

Background: In critically ill patients needing IV access, ultrasound has helped improve gaining access to a set of peripheral veins, located deeper in the arm.  The time it takes to do this however is not insignificant but even more importantly is that once you achieve success, the line can fail due to a short catheter length. Central venous catheters, often seen as a solution to this latter issue, are not without their own risks and complications.  Therefore, a nice alternative option may be a midline catheter. These catheters are not meant for fast, large volume resuscitations because they also take time to place, but also have a longer catheter length which slows down infusion rates. Midline catheters are really about having safe access that is unlikely to be dislodged. This is a great option when you have medications you want to give but not have extravasation occur (i.e. vasopressors, hypertonic saline, calcium chloride, etc.).

February 3, 2020

The perimortem cesarean section, or better named the resuscitative hysterotomy, is a procedure that is performed at or near death of a pregnant patient.  Most experts agree that this procedure should be performed in a maternal arrest with a pregnancy ≥24 weeks of gestation.  Although there is no real data regarding the optimal time to delivery post-arrest, survival drastically decreases when the time from maternal death to delivery reaches 5 minutes (ie. Therefore a 4 minute rule has become standard). In this talk from Rebellion in EM 2019, Dr. Jaime Hope, MD walks us through the steps of performing this stressful procedure.

January 31, 2020

The REBEL EM/EEM 2020 Fellowship  Competition involved creating an infographic about a myth in Emergency Medicine. An important element of the design was the ease of sharing through social media to increase the reach and exposure of the educational content. The piece was supposed to be creative, demonstrate visual impact in communication of the topic, showcase educational prowess, and teach us all something about a topic that the registrants were passionate about! All applicants had to be in good standing at an accredited Emergency Medicine program in the United States, or in good academic standing at any Emergency Medicine residency program in the world, and be available to attend all 3 days of the conference in San Francisco, CA (May 21 - 23, 2020).

January 27, 2020

Background: The combination of vitamin C, hydrocortisone and thiamine in sepsis has been a topic of hot debate in the past couple years.  There is a hypothetical pathophysiological basis to make an argument for the use of this combination of medications, but as with anything it is important to ensure there are no untoward effects either. In Dr. Marik’s before and after study [1] we saw some pretty amazing results showing that treatment reduced hospital mortality  by 31.9% (Treatment Group 8.5% vs Control Group 40.4%). Too good to be true?  Well in short, YES…the major issues with this study were it was not a randomized controlled trial, had a small sample size, was a single center study, and had significant selection bias.  Well we finally have our first randomized controlled trial evaluating the “metabolic cocktail” in a general population of septic shock adult patients.

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