Knowledge translation (KT) is the process involved in moving research from the laboratory bench, research journals, and academic conferences to the hands of providers who can put it to practical use at the bedside or in the prehospital environment. REBEL EM has been dedicated to this initiative for several years and is now happy to present

REBEL CME

. The goal is to provide Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Continuing Education Hours (CEH) for a nominal fee to support the blog, on several of these activities. Use the Coupon Code “REBEL” to get a 10% Discount on Annual CME Subscriptions and for Individual Posts.
  • All Categories
  • REBEL CME
All Categories
  • All Categories
  • REBEL CME

REBEL Cast Ep74 – Is it all About the VITAMINS in Sepsis?

Background: The combination of vitamin C, hydrocortisone and thiamine in sepsis has been a topic of hot debate in the past couple years.  There is a hypothetical pathophysiological basis to make an argument for the use of this combination of …

Read More
Infectious DiseaseResuscitation

REBEL Cast Ep73: Are Peripheral Vasopressors Safe?

Background: Traditionally, vasopressors have been given through central venous catheters (CVCs) in the critically ill.However, the time it takes to place a CVC is time a patient could potentially remain hypotensive. Early initiation of vasopressors may be associated with reduced …

Read More
Resuscitation

REBEL Cast Ep70 – Time to Antibiotics in Sepsis

Background: Antibiotics are one of the cornerstones of therapy in the treatment of sepsis/septic shock, however according to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines, time to antibiotics is a core measure, though there is weak evidence in support of this.  Most …

Read More
Infectious Disease

REBEL Cast Episode 67: EXTEND-ing Times for Systemic Thrombolysis in Acute Ischemic Stroke?

Background: Despite the lack of replication of the NINDS & ECASS-3 trials, guidelines recommend the use of tPA in the ≤4.5hr window after the onset of symptoms of acute ischemic stroke [2]. These recommendations used non-contrast computed tomography (NCHCT) for the …

Read More
Neurology

All You Need to Know About Measles

Background: In 2000, the U.S. achieved the elimination of measles, defined as the absence of sustained transmission of the virus for more than 12 months [3,7]. Unfortunately, this success was short lived.  According to the CDC, 555 cases of measles have …

Read More
Infectious DiseasePediatrics

REBEL Cast Episode 66: The COACT Trial – Coronary Angiography After Cardiac Arrest without STEMI

Background: Post-ROSC care is a multifaceted endeavor that includes targeted temperature management (TTM), vital-organ support, and treatment of the underlying cause of arrest. One of the most common causes of cardiac arrest is acute coronary syndrome.  Current European and American guidelines …

Read More
CardiovascularResuscitation

The Great Debate Between Balanced and Unbalanced Crystalloids Continues

Background: Although the debate over balanced (i.e. lactated ringers, PlasmaLyte) vs unbalanced (i.e. 0.9% saline) crystalloids has not been settled, fluid resuscitation continues to be a fundamental therapy given to critically ill patients.  0.9% saline is one of the most common …

Read More
Endocrine, Metabolic, Fluid, and Electrolytes

Tranexamic Acid (TXA) for Everything that Bleeds?

Background: TXA is a synthetic lysine derivative that binds with the lysine site on plasminogen and inhibits fibrinolysis.  TXA is not a new drug. Studies from the late 1960s and early 1970s have shown reduced bleeding and need for transfusions in …

Read More
Hematology and Oncology

High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) – Part 1: How It Works

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has become increasingly popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  I first started using it as a pediatric intensive care fellow, but …

Read More
Thoracic and Respiratory

REBEL Cast Ep56 – PARAMEDIC-2: Time to Abandon Epinephrine in OHCA?

Background: Epinephrine(adrenaline) has been used in advanced life support in cardiac arrest since the early 1960s. Despite the routine recommendation for its use, evidence to support administration is less than ideal.  Although it is clear from multiple observational studies that epinephrine …

Read More
Resuscitation

Sponsored