REBEL Cast

is the blogs audio version. The podcast typically starts by setting a clinical stage with a pertinent clinical question, followed by a discussion of the paper with pertinent results, strengths, limitations, and further discussion. Finally, we end every podcast with clinical take home points from the papers being reviewed. If there are papers you think we should evaluate, email them to srrezaie@gmail.com.

June 26, 2019

Take Home Points on SVT

  • Superficial venous thrombosis refers to a clot and inflammation in the larger, or “axial” veins of the lower extremities and superficial thrombophlebitis refers to clot and inflammation in the tributary veins of the lower extremities. While we previously thought of this as a benign entity, we actually found the superficial venous thrombosis has been associated with concomitant DVT and PE.
  • Small, superficial clots can be treated with compression, NSAIDs, and elevation. These patients should be seen for follow up within 7-10 days to make sure the clot has not progressed.
  • Clots that are longer than 5 cm should be treated with prophylactic dosing of anticoagulation: fondaparinux 2.5mg subq once daily for 45 days or enoxaparin 40 mg subq once daily for 45 days. 
  • Clots that are within 3 cm of the sapheno-femoral junction should be treated the same as a DVT. 
  • A superficial thrombus could mean there is a deeper clot elsewhere, even in the other leg! Take a good history, perform a thorough physical exam and consider a bilateral lower extremity DVT study in concerning patients.

June 12, 2019

Take Home Points on Measles

  • There is a resurgence of measles worldwide
  • Incubation period is 10 – 14 days and patients are contagious 4 days before rash develops and up to 5 days after
  • Suspect measles in any patient with an acute febrile illness who is either un- or undervaccinated
  • Know about Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) schedules and isolation times of various populations
  • Healthcare workers should wear N95 masks while taking care of patients with suspected measles, and report cases to their local health department.

June 3, 2019

Background: Despite the lack of replication of the NINDS & ECASS-3 trials, guidelines recommend the use of tPA in the ≤4.5hr window after the onset of symptoms of acute ischemic stroke [2]. These recommendations used non-contrast computed tomography (NCHCT) for the selection of patients.  More recent endovascular studies have shown that perfusion-based imaging can show potential viable brain tissue beyond the 4.5 hour mark in patients with large vessel occlusions and result in good neurologic outcomes.  This advance has prompted investigators to look at perfusion-based technology to identify a larger cohort of patients without large vessel occlusion that may be candidates for systemic thrombolysis.  One of the big fears in stroke management is the concept of indication creep: finding more uses for a medication or product without strong evidence to support its use. The bigger question is, does this increase in use help the company’s bottom line or the patient? It is no wonder physicians are skeptical of industry sponsored trials, as we sometimes question the motives behind the study.  Now we have another industry sponsored trial: EXTEND. In this trial.

May 29, 2019

Take Home Points on Tracheostomy Emergencies

  • Track is mature in 7 days - don't blindly replace before then because concern for false track creation
  • All bleeding needs to be taken seriously and should be evaluated by surgery
  • If not ventilating through trach - go through it systematically to find malfunction

May 15, 2019

Take Home Points on Epiglottitis

  • Epiglottitis has demonstrated a resurgence in the adult population. It is no longer a pediatric only disease.
  • The classic presentation of epiglottitis (3Ds of drooling, dysphagia and distress) is uncommon
  • Epiglottitis should be high on your differential for the bounce-back patient who continues to complain of worsening sore throat
  • Definitive diagnosis is made by flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy
  • Be ready for a difficult airway