REBEL Cast

is the blogs audio version. The podcast typically starts by setting a clinical stage with a pertinent clinical question, followed by a discussion of the paper with pertinent results, strengths, limitations, and further discussion. Finally, we end every podcast with clinical take home points from the papers being reviewed. If there are papers you think we should evaluate, email them to srrezaie@gmail.com.

September 11, 2019

Take Home Points:

  • Get definitive airway control when necessary
    • Use modality you’re most comfortable with
  • Hard signs -  pulsatile bleeding, bruit or thrill, expanding hematoma, airway compromise, massive hemoptysis (think airway injury), hematemesis (think esophageal injury), grossly injured trachea, neurologic deficit, subcutaneous emphysema.
  • Soft Signs are hypotension that resolves, stable hematoma, wound in proximity to major vascular structure, minor hemoptysis, dyspnea, dysphagia, chest tube air leak, vascular bruit or thrill (depends on surgeon).
  • Hard Sign on presentation goes straight to the OR. Soft Sign on presentation gets some imaging done
  • Resuscitate with blood products -> Activate massive transfusion protocol
  • Most hemorrhage will respond to direct pressure
  • Don't miss other injuries!

September 2, 2019

Background: Convulsive status epilepticus is the most common pediatric neurological emergency worldwide.  Currently, phenytoin (UK & Europe) or fosphenytoin (USA) is the recommended second-line IV anticonvulsant for the treatment of pediatric status epilepticus.  Some evidence and providers however suggest that levetiracetam could be an effective and safer alternative. Recently not one, but two RCTs were published trying to figure out whether levetiracetam or phenytoin should be second-line treatment of pediatric status epilepticus.

August 21, 2019

Take Home Points

  • Myxedema coma is severe, decompensated hypothyroidism with a very high mortality.
  • Classic features include: decreased mental status, hypothermia, hypotension, bradycardia, hyponatremia, hypoglycemia, and hypoventilation
  • Work up includes looking for and treating precipitating causes, most commonly infection as well as serum levels of TSH, T4 and cortisol
  • Treat for the possibility of adrenal insufficiency with stress dose steroids such as hydrocortisone 100 mg IV
  • The exact means of thyroid replacement is controversial. Definitely given 100-500 mcg levothyroxine and discuss the simultaneous administration of T3 with your endocrine and ICU teams.

August 19, 2019

Background: Antibiotics are one of the cornerstones of therapy in the treatment of sepsis/septic shock, however according to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines, time to antibiotics is a core measure, though there is weak evidence in support of this.  Most of the evidence supporting this is based off retrospective studies that showed delays in the administration of antibiotics after the development of septic shock is associated with an increase in mortality of almost 7.6% per hour [3]. The major issues with retrospective studies are that they are uncontrolled, chart quality may be inaccurate, baseline status of patients may be unbalanced and thus allow selection bias that can affect the results. Although, prospective observational studies have failed to consistently show an association between early antibiotics and mortality benefit, the guidelines still recommend early antibiotic administration within an hour of sepsis recognition.

August 7, 2019

Take Home Points

  • There is no real distinction between syncope and near syncope.

  • Older folk with near syncope or syncope should be treated the same.

  • Patient with high risk features its reasonable to admit but if they’re low risk, well-appearing and have reasonable follow up discharge home is fine.