January 21, 2021

As EM physicians, we are taught how to manage and treat many serious and life threatening conditions, most of them we know like the back of our hands, and some we look up on shift. The most important things to know are the “think on your feet” situations, when patients are actively trying to die in front of you, and you don’t have the time to look things up. We all know how to manage a bleed, whether internal or external, but do you know how to treat bleeding in a Hemophilia patient?! I didn’t until April, 2018 when my newborn son was diagnosed with Hemophilia A.  In this segment, I will explain and simplify hemophilia for you down to the “need to know” essential information so when you are managing a hemophilia patient in the ED, like my son, you will know what to do. 

January 18, 2021

Case: A 51-year-old woman, with no pertinent past medical history, presented to the Emergency Department (ED) complaining of right hand pain after a large fragment from a wooden cooking spoon penetrated her right palm approximately 1 week ago. She reported immediately removing the splinter and starting old, previously prescribed amoxicillin prior to her visit. She was prompted to visit the ED after her pain gradually increased, affecting her ability to flex and extend her right fourth digit.

On physical exam, the patient was afebrile with all other vital signs within normal limits. There was significant tenderness localized to the base of the right fourth digit near the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint, associated with edema, ecchymosis, and erythema. While the patients right hand remained neurovascularly intact, significant restrictions in passive motion, including flexion and extension, was noted to the right fourth digit. On visual inspection, no foreign bodies were appreciated.

A radiograph of the right hand was ordered, which was negative for any acute abnormalities, including foreign body. However, due to the patients clinical presentation and the potential radiolucency of the suspected foreign body, a point-of-care ultrasound was performed.

January 14, 2021

Background Information: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains a diagnostic challenge to providers and a significant burden on healthcare systems globally. Despite the advancement of invasive medical therapies such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and extracorporeal membranous oxygenation (ECMO) at designated cardiac catherization centers, the majority of these patients sustain poor outcomes due to hypoxic brain injury. Clinical features of neurologic injury are typically delayed until 72 hours after admission. As a result, many neuro-prognostication tools have been developed to assist with clinical decision making as well as reduce expensive futile interventions.1 Some of these neuroprognostication tools include the Cardiac Arrest Hospital Prognosis (CAHP), OHCA and Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) risk tools. Unfortunately, these are complex and time consuming, thus limiting their use in the emergency department (ED). The authors of the following study sought out to develop and validate a point-based risk score to support clinical decision making and predict neurologic outcomes using the cerebral performance category (CPC) scale (Figure 1)

January 13, 2021

Take Home Points
  • Nausea and Vomiting has an exceedingly large differential - don’t just anchor on GI presentations
  • H&P important - Duration, frequency, content, and associated symptoms
  • Alcohol swab -> If no line and want quick treatment give swab
  • Ondansetron -> oral you can give without hesitation but if giving IV check QTC / electrolytes and give slowly
  • Droperidol / Haloperidol -> Works really well, QTc prolongation has been overhyped and dont give to parkinsons patient.

January 11, 2021

Background: Current trauma resuscitation prioritizes control of bleeding and uses massive transfusion protocols to prevent and treat coagulopathy. This is typically done in the form of massive transfusion protocols delivered in proportions that approach the composition of whole blood. Two strategies to help guide this replacement of blood products are conventional coagulation tests and viscoelastic hemostatic assays.