January 9, 2020

Background: Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is the most widely utilized approach for patients requiring emergency tracheal intubation.  RSI typically requires the use of a induction agent followed by the use of a neuromuscular blocking agent (NMBA) to improve the overall intubation conditions and therefore improve first-attempt intubation success rate. Historically, succinylcholine has been the preferred NMBA, due to its fast onset (45 – 60 seconds) and fast offset (6 – 8 minutes of paralysis). Recent studies, however, show that rocuronium is an effective agent (similar timing of onset for ideal intubating conditions) as well.  When used at a dose of 1.2mg/kg, rocuronium has a similar onset time to succinylcholine of about 1 minute. Additionally, succinylcholine has several contraindications (see bottom of the post) while rocuronium has no contraindications (except for hypersensitivity) which has increased the debate about the paralytic agent of choice for RSI.

January 6, 2020

Background: Although the standard positioning for intubation is supine in the sniffing position, there has been recent literature in the past decade that elevating the head of the bed to 25 to 30 degrees may be a preferable setup for direct laryngoscopy due to improved laryngeal view and reduced airway complications. These studies have been conducted in multiple settings and patient populations including the prehospital setting, the emergency department, and the operating room (for elective cases). Additionally, video-assisted laryngoscopy has been a relatively recent innovation in airway management: the first video laryngoscope produced commercially became available in 2001. Similarly, this technology has been studied in multiple settings including in the emergency department and in the operating room. Both head-elevated direct laryngoscopy and video-assisted laryngoscopy have been studied with a variety of outcomes including first-pass success rate, time to intubation, and mortality rates. However, despite video-assisted laryngoscopy becoming increasingly ubiquitous, its limitations include a high cost and the possibility of components becoming damaged. Both of these innovations in intubation—video-assisted laryngoscopy and elevating the head of the bed—remain debated within the field of emergency medicine.

REBEL Review 91: Management of Vasopressor Extravasation

Created December 8, 2019 | Procedures and Skills | DOWNLOAD

November 4, 2019

Background: Despite decades of experience with endotracheal intubation, we continue to find approaches to improving the process of how we intubate. In this talk at Rebellion in EM 2019, Rob J. Bryant, MD gave a 14 minute 12 second talk on 3 things that have changed the way he intubates (Back Up Head Elevated - BUHE, Bougie 1st Intubation, & Team Management).  

September 16, 2019

Background: Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) involves the use of an induction agent followed by a neuromuscular blocking (NMB) agent to obtain optimal intubating conditions.  Administration of a NMB results in apnea which, in turn, can lead to oxygen desaturation.  Oxygen desaturation during rapid sequence intubation may lead to serious adverse events including dysrhythmias, hypotension, and cardiac arrest.  Preoxygenation helps extend the duration of safe apnea and has 2 major goals:
  1. Attempt to achieve an O2 saturation of 100%
  2. Maximize oxygen storage in the lungs by denitrogenation of the residual capacity of the lungs (Approximately 95% of oxygen reservoir)
Preoxygenation is assessed in the ED but usually through pulse oximetry which is inadequate.  In the operating room, anesthesiolgists use gas analyzers to quantify and optimize preoxygenation with ETO2.  In critically ill patients, preoxygenation should be performed to achieve an ETO2 ≥85% based on the response to the 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and Difficult Airway Society [2].
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