February 13, 2019

Online educational resources, social media, and asynchronous education increasingly dominate innovation and continuing medical education for practicing emergency physicians. The “Free Open-Access Medical Education” (FOAM) movement has utilized the power of global connectivity to drive narrowing of the knowledge translation window, however critics have urged caution and warned of error, as many of these resources lack peer review or quality control.REBEL EM is an online educational resource widely used throughout the FOAM community, garnering an average of 3,000 - 30,000 views/engagements per educational post, and satisfying all quality indicators that have been previously identified as markers of reliability and usability for digital scholarship.To this end, we at REBEL EM are conducting a survey looking at rates of certain medication usage in the treatment of renal colic.

June 29, 2018

Background: Ureteric (renal) colic is a common, painful condition encountered in the Emergency Department (ED). Sustained contraction of smooth muscle in the ureter as a kidney stone passes the length of the ureter leads to pain. The majority of stones will pass spontaneously (i.e. without urologic intervention). For over a decade, calcium channel blockers (i.e. nifedipine) and, more commonly, alpha adrenoreceptor antagonists (i.e. tamsulosin) have been employed in the treatment of ureteral colic for their potential ability to increase stone passage, reduce pain medication use and reduce urologic interventions. These interventions were mostly based on poor methodologic studies and meta-analyses of these flawed studies (Hollingsworth 2016)

Over the past 3-4 years, a small number of higher-quality RCTs have been published (Ferre 2009, Pickard 2015, Furyk 2016). These studies have demonstrated a lack of benefit for routine use of alpha blockers. However, secondary outcomes suggest a possible benefit in larger stones (> 6 mm). In spite of recent multiple studies, the use of alpha blockers remains an area of active debate.

March 26, 2018

Background: Welcome back to REBEL Cast episode 47.  In this issue we are going to talk about some recent trials published in the past year that have gotten some love in the FOAMed world.  We have been meaning to discuss these trials, but just simply didn't have the time until now.  What trials are we reviewing?
  • The age of PRBCs in transfusion
  • The usefulness of lidocaine in renal colic
  • The utility of oxygen therapy in Stroke

September 25, 2017

Background: One of the most common imaging modalities used in the emergency department (ED) today is computed tomography (CT) scans using intravenous radiocontrast agents. Use of IV contrast can help increase visualization of pathology as compared to non-contrast CTs. However, many patients do not get IV contrast due to fear of contrast induced nephropathy.  Furthermore, waiting for renal function values delays the care of patients and prolongs time spent in the ED with a potential to increase adverse effects on patient centered outcomes due to delays.

April 4, 2017

Background: The treatment of urinary retention is pretty straightforward; place either a Foley catheter or suprapubic catheter to decompress the bladder.  What is less clear, and more often debated, is if we need to clamp the catheter after 200 – 1000mLs of urine output or just allow complete drainage.  Historic teaching has been to do intermittent volume drainage to avoid complications such as hematuria, circulatory collapse, and worsening renal failure.  I distinctly remember being taught this as a resident, but not sure that I ever evaluated the literature until recently. 
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