September 2, 2014

Welcome to the September REBELCast 2014, where Matt, Swami, and I are going to tackle a couple more scenarios to help your clinical practice.  Today, we are going to specifically tackle two different topics: Topic #1: The use of Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV) in the Pre-Hospital Treatment of Patients with Severe Respiratory Distress Topic #2: Once Weekly Dalbavancin for Skin Infections

July 17, 2014

Animal bites are a common cause of injury in the United States. About 4.5 million Americans/year (5% of all traumatic wounds in the ED) will sustain a bite injury. Dog bites compromise a majority of these wounds. The classic teaching is that dog bites should not be closed primarily and they should all be prophylactically treated with antibiotics. When dog bites become infected, Pasteurella species, specifically P. canis, are the most common pathogens. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (AKA “dog-mentin”) is the antibiotic of choice. It’s also important to keep in mind that Emergency Department repaired lacerations (not just dog bites but all comers) have a 3-7% infection rate. As usual, the dogma (pun intended) is based on minimal if any evidence. Additionally, there are some recent articles that are relevant to the discussion that should be discussed.

July 1, 2014

Welcome to REBEL Cast Episode 1, where Matt, Swami, and I are going to tackle a couple of scenarios to help your clinical practice.  Today, we are going to specifically tackle two different topics:
  • Topic #1: Clinically Important Biphasic Anaphylaxis
  • Topic #2: Total Lymphocyte Count (TLC) as a Surrogate Marker for CD4 Counts

REBEL Review 58: Antimicrobial Chemoprophylaxis in Meningococcal Disease

Created March 12, 2014 | Infectious Disease | DOWNLOAD

February 17, 2014

Critical illness is a life-threatening multisystem process that can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Timely, appropriate, and effective care for these patients is something all emergency physicians strive for. Using data from clinical trials of previous years, we can improve patient management and outcomes. In this post, I list my five critical care articles for your clinical practice in the care of these patients.
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