January 10, 2015

Welcome to the January 2015 REBELCast, where Swami and I are going to tackle a very important scenario that comes up in the daily practice of not only Emergency Medicine, but also in Medicine.  Today we are going to specifically tackle one topic: Topic: Is the use of cephalosporin antibiotics in patients with a history of penicillin class antibiotics safe?

January 5, 2015

Background: Streptococcal pharyngitis is a common presentation to primary care and Emergency Department physicians. Every year, 10 million patients in the United States are treated with antibiotics for pharyngitis. However, less than 10% of these patients actually have strep pharyngitis (Barnett 2013). Prescribing of antibiotics for these patients centers on three arguments:
  1. Antibiotics reduce symptomology
  2. Antibiotics reduce the rate of suppurative complications
  3. Antibiotics reduce the rate of non-suppurative complications (primarily Rheumatic Heart Disease).
So, do patients with strep throat need to be treated with antibiotics?

September 2, 2014

Welcome to the September REBELCast 2014, where Matt, Swami, and I are going to tackle a couple more scenarios to help your clinical practice.  Today, we are going to specifically tackle two different topics: Topic #1: The use of Non-Invasive Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV) in the Pre-Hospital Treatment of Patients with Severe Respiratory Distress Topic #2: Once Weekly Dalbavancin for Skin Infections

July 17, 2014

Animal bites are a common cause of injury in the United States. About 4.5 million Americans/year (5% of all traumatic wounds in the ED) will sustain a bite injury. Dog bites compromise a majority of these wounds. The classic teaching is that dog bites should not be closed primarily and they should all be prophylactically treated with antibiotics. When dog bites become infected, Pasteurella species, specifically P. canis, are the most common pathogens. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (AKA “dog-mentin”) is the antibiotic of choice. It’s also important to keep in mind that Emergency Department repaired lacerations (not just dog bites but all comers) have a 3-7% infection rate. As usual, the dogma (pun intended) is based on minimal if any evidence. Additionally, there are some recent articles that are relevant to the discussion that should be discussed.

July 1, 2014

Welcome to REBEL Cast Episode 1, where Matt, Swami, and I are going to tackle a couple of scenarios to help your clinical practice.  Today, we are going to specifically tackle two different topics:
  • Topic #1: Clinically Important Biphasic Anaphylaxis
  • Topic #2: Total Lymphocyte Count (TLC) as a Surrogate Marker for CD4 Counts
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