October 10, 2020

From Oct 6th – 8th, 2020, Haney Mallemat (@CriticalCareNow) and his team put on an absolutely amazing online critical care conference called ResusX Rewired.  ResusX is a conference designed by resuscitationists to provide clinicians with the most up to date skills and knowledge to help make a difference in your patients' lives.  Haney and his crew made a combination of short-format, high-yield lectures, and completely customizable small group sessions with procedural demos seem easy.  There were so many high-quality speakers and pearls that I learned from this conference that I wanted to archive them here in one post for reference and to share with our readers/followers.

October 8, 2020

Background: Prior to the discovery of thrombolytics, clinicians could only observe their patients completing their myocardial infarctions and then classify them according to whether their subsequent ECGs developed Q waves. When trials showed a clear survival benefit with thrombolytics (especially in STE) this shifted the paradigm from “Q-wave/ non Q-wave MI” to “STEMI / non-STEMI”. Eventually STEMI became synonymous with acute coronary occlusion (ACO) requiring reperfusion, except this connection was never studied in trials. Unfortunately, the STEMI criteria have limited diagnostic criteria for ACO, leading to false cath lab activation. And worse, missing ⅓ of ACO (NSTEMI), depriving them of emergent reperfusion therapy. This led many authors to shift from STEMI/ NSTEMI to ACO-MI/ non- ACO-MI. 

April 30, 2018

I was working a busy shift in the ED, like many of us do, and the next patient I was going to see was a 57 year old male with no real medical problems complaining of chest pain.  I remember thinking as I walked into the room this guy looks ashen and diaphoretic….he doesn’t look well.  He is a paramedic telling me how he has been having off and on chest pain for the past several months.  He just had a stress test two months ago that was “negative”.  Today he was working on his pool and developed the same chest discomfort as he had been having off and on the past several months, but today, the pain would just not go away.  In his mind, he thought this might be an ulcer and just needed some Pepcid to help. He got put on the monitor and an ECG was run… The patient involved in this case has given permission to share the story, and relevant images with the knowledge that this information will be used for the purposes of education.

April 30, 2018

I was working a busy shift in the ED, like many of us do, and the next patient I was going to see was a 57 year old male with no real medical problems complaining of chest pain.  I remember thinking as I walked into the room this guy looks ashen and diaphoretic….he doesn’t look well.  He is a paramedic telling me how he has been having off and on chest pain for the past several months.  He just had a stress test two months ago that was “negative”.  Today he was working on his pool and developed the same chest discomfort as he had been having off and on the past several months, but today, the pain would just not go away.  In his mind, he thought this might be an ulcer and just needed some Pepcid to help. He got put on the monitor and an ECG was run… The patient involved in this case has given permission to share the story, and relevant images with the knowledge that this information will be used for the purposes of education.
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