January 21, 2021

As EM physicians, we are taught how to manage and treat many serious and life threatening conditions, most of them we know like the back of our hands, and some we look up on shift. The most important things to know are the “think on your feet” situations, when patients are actively trying to die in front of you, and you don’t have the time to look things up. We all know how to manage a bleed, whether internal or external, but do you know how to treat bleeding in a Hemophilia patient?! I didn’t until April, 2018 when my newborn son was diagnosed with Hemophilia A.  In this segment, I will explain and simplify hemophilia for you down to the “need to know” essential information so when you are managing a hemophilia patient in the ED, like my son, you will know what to do. 

October 8, 2020

Background: Prior to the discovery of thrombolytics, clinicians could only observe their patients completing their myocardial infarctions and then classify them according to whether their subsequent ECGs developed Q waves. When trials showed a clear survival benefit with thrombolytics (especially in STE) this shifted the paradigm from “Q-wave/ non Q-wave MI” to “STEMI / non-STEMI”. Eventually STEMI became synonymous with acute coronary occlusion (ACO) requiring reperfusion, except this connection was never studied in trials. Unfortunately, the STEMI criteria have limited diagnostic criteria for ACO, leading to false cath lab activation. And worse, missing ⅓ of ACO (NSTEMI), depriving them of emergent reperfusion therapy. This led many authors to shift from STEMI/ NSTEMI to ACO-MI/ non- ACO-MI. 

June 29, 2020

Background: In patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ARDS clinical trials network recommends a target partial pressure of arterial oxygen (Pao2) between 55 and 80 mmHg. Goals of arterial oxygenation are not based on robust experimental data and prior evidence has shown the feasibility of targeting a lower partial pressure of arterial oxygen in patients with ARDS. The authors of this trial, aptly named the study, LOCO2 (Liberal Oxygenation vs Conservative Oxygenation). They sought to determine whether a lower oxygen strategy was safe in patients with ARDS.
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