March 26, 2018

Background: Welcome back to REBEL Cast episode 47.  In this issue we are going to talk about some recent trials published in the past year that have gotten some love in the FOAMed world.  We have been meaning to discuss these trials, but just simply didn't have the time until now.  What trials are we reviewing?
  • The age of PRBCs in transfusion
  • The usefulness of lidocaine in renal colic
  • The utility of oxygen therapy in Stroke

March 12, 2018

In Episode 46a we discussed respiratory failure and NIV.  In episode 46b we are going move on to the patient where you have tried NIV and your patient just doesn’t seem to be improving.  You decide to intubate your patient and connect them to the ventilator.  Now the ventilator starts beeping and your patient begins to decompensate.  What are the steps you use to assess the problem and fix it?

February 26, 2018

Imagine you have a patient in respiratory failure sitting right in front of you. The patient has an increased work of breathing and obviously in distress.  Monitors are beeping, nurses are asking you what you want to do, and if you don’t do something, the patient is going to arrest and potentially die.  What is your framework for tackling these patients?  Well, I had a chance to sit down with Haney Mallemat and discuss his framework for managing respiratory failure and NIV.

February 5, 2018

What’s Wrong With Lectures/Presentations Now?

  • Lecturing style has remained stagnant despite the fact that our understanding of how people learn has changed.
  • Most presentations make the supportive media (i.e. slides) the focus of the presentation without thought about the story or the delivery.
  • Lectures are too focused on the educator instead of focusing on the needs of the learner.

January 25, 2018

Background: Placement of vascular access for administration of resuscitation drugs and fluids is a common procedure in the management of out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). While intravenous (IV) placement has been the standard approach for decades, intraosseous (IO) access is rapid and safe and may be the preferred approach due to fact that the bone marrow does not collapse during shock states as peripheral veins often do. Despite it’s advantages, there are concerns about IO placement because of the potential for drugs to pool in the marrow and not circulate. Prior studies have shown an association with tibial IO placement and decreased rate of ROSC though no association with worse neurologic outcomes (Feinstein 2017).