December 19, 2020

Back in April 2020, on REBEL Cast episode 79 we sat down to discuss COVID-19.  Specifically, we focused on not intubating patients early and why ARDSnet may not be the best ventilator paradigm for patients with COVID-19.  By popular demand, we decided to follow up on this podcast.  We are now just about 9 months since we recorded this podcast and I wanted to sit down with the same group and see if they had any amendments, they wanted to make regarding what we discussed.

December 17, 2020

Background: Intravenous alteplase is the current standard care for treatment of acute ischemic stroke (AIS) despite active debate on the research supporting its use.  The window for its use has been restricted to <3h of symptom onset based on the results of the NINDS trial and extended to a time window of <4.5h based on the results of the ECASS-3 trial. Both studies excluded patients with unknown time of onset and these patients are excluded from consideration for thrombolytics in real life as well. These trials are the only randomized studies showing benefit of intravenous alteplase vs placebo in acute ischemic stroke to date.  Of note, both of these trials have undergone reanalysis calling the validity of their results into question.  Despite which side of the debate you fall on, stroke care has moved on with advanced perfusion imaging and thrombectomy in large vessel occlusion strokes. Increased use of perfusion imaging has challenged the idea that time is a critical determinant of which patients should be considered for thrombolytics.

December 16, 2020

Take Home Points
  • This is a resuscitative hysterotomy - focus is on saving the mother first. Delivering the fetus can improve venous return thus increasing chance to save mom
  • Don’t focus on gestational age to make the decision - if you think the belly is big enough to be causing compression of vascular structures, the procedure is indicated
  • Once you’ve made the decision - it’s go time. The faster you do it, the more likely you can salvage mom and the fetus
  • Large vertical incision to maximize exposure, locate uterus, vertical incision with scalpel and extend with scissors

December 2, 2020

Take Home Points
  • Be sure to consider mesenteric ischemia in any elderly patient with abdominal pain or lower gastrointestinal (GI) complaints.  Remember, the presentation can be tricky to find and they may have a reassuring abdominal exam.
  • Ask about artherosclerotic risk factors, history of cardiovascular disease including atrial fibrillation and prior embolic events, and a history of intestinal angina to help clue you in to the diagnosis.
  • Lab abnormalities could include leukocytosis, lactemia or elevated d-dimer.  But normal labs cannot exclude this disease.
  • The money is in the CTA.  Get it as fast as possible because time is bowel.
  • Consult your surgeons and interventional radiologists eary, because again TIME IS BOWEL

November 19, 2020

Background Information: Central venous catheterization is a common procedure performed in the ICU for the purposes of drug administration and resuscitation. The subclavian vein is the more preferred access site given its fixed puncture location, ease for nursing access and low incidence of infections.1 Landmark guided catheterization has a widely variable success rate and has been shown to increase the risk of complications such as hematoma formation and pneumothoraxes.2,3 The use of real-time ultrasound guidance has thus led to more central lines being placed in the internal jugular and femoral lines, however there is substantial debate regarding its use in subclavian vein catheterization.4,5 The authors of this study sought to compare the efficacy and safety of static ultrasound-guided puncture with traditional anatomic landmark guided subclavian vein puncture.