Author Archive for: srrezaie

Should I Stay or Should I Go: Outpatient Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

05 Dec
December 5, 2016

venous-thromboembolismBackground: The care of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in the US with an increasingly large percentage of patients being discharged home from the Emergency Department (ED).  It wasn’t too long ago that all patients diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) would be admitted for anticoagulation.  Some of the reasons for this were lack of literature to support outpatient therapy in the US, inability to arrange outpatient follow up, and, of course, medicolegal concerns.  Dr. Jeff Kline, one of the thought leaders in VTE, advocates for the outpatient treatment of “low-risk” patients using a modified Hestia criteria supplemented with additional criteria (POMPE-C) for patients with active cancer.  This publication is the initial results of his rivaroxaban-based treatment protocol. Read more →

Mythbuster: Glucose Levels Must be Below a “Safe” Threshold Before Discharge

01 Dec
December 1, 2016

discharge-glucoseBackground: Anyone who works in the Emergency Department has seen patients brought in by EMS or sent from the clinic with a chief complaint of “high blood sugar.”  Now, we are not talking about patients with diabetic ketoacidosis, but just simple hyperglycemia. This is a common complaint with no real consensus on optimal blood glucose levels before safe discharge. Read more →

Treatment of Submassive Pulmonary Embolism (PE): Full Dose, Half Dose, or No Dose?

03 Nov
November 3, 2016

submassive-peSubmassive pulmonary embolism (PE) is responsible for approximately 20% of all PEs.  Although the in-hospital mortality has been reported as about 5%, there is significant morbidity associated with this diagnosis such as chronic pulmonary hypertension, impaired quality of life, persistent right ventricular disfunction, and recurrent venous thromboembolism.  The literature suggests that systemic thrombolytics can improve morbidity and maybe mortality, but this comes at the risk of increased major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage (2 – 3%) when compared to anticoagulation alone. Read more →

The HYPRESS Trial: Early Steroids to Prevent Septic Shock

31 Oct
October 31, 2016

hypress-trialBackground: The most recent surviving sepsis campaign recommends the use of hydrocortisone in patients with refractory septic shock (i.e. vasopressor dependent).  However, the use of hydrocortisone in severe sepsis without shock still remains a very controversial topic. Recommendations for hydrocortisone are mostly based on 2 randomized clinical trials (i.e. Annane et al [2] and CORTICUS [3]), but subsequent meta-analyses had more mixed results.  Shock reversal was consistently improved irrespective of disease severity; however, mortality outcomes were not as consistent.  Therefore, it has been hypothesized that early hydrocortisone administration could prevent shock by attenuating patient’s inflammatory response. Read more →

The PESIT Trial: Do All Patients with 1st Time Syncope Need a Pulmonary Embolism Workup?

24 Oct
October 24, 2016

the-pesit-trialBackground: Syncope is a very frustrating chief complaint for many in the medical field.  There is no gold standard test and no validated decision instrument. It represents about 3 – 5% of ED visits, 1 – 6% of hospital admissions, and in patients over the age of 65 years it is the 6th most common cause of hospitalization [2][3]. Additionally, both ED and inpatient work ups are notoriously low yield for finding significant pathology. Pulmonary embolism is one of the myriad of diagnoses included in the differential diagnosis of syncope, but there is little information looking at its prevalence amongst hospitalized patients. Fast forward to Oct. 20th, 2016 and there is now some evidence just published in the NEJM: The PESIT Trial. Read more →

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