April 5, 2021

Background Information:

The use of corticosteroids in patients with pneumonia secondary to COVID-19 has been a controversially hot topic, particularly early on in the pandemic. Prior evidence seen in Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome have led some to argue against their use due to delayed viral clearance.1 More recent evidence related to SARS-Cov-2 has specifically shown reduced mortality and reduced need for mechanical ventilation with corticosteroids.2-4 More recently, the RECOVERY Trial showed an improvement in 28-day mortality among patients on oxygen therapy who received Dexamethasone.5 Little information exists in the literature about patients with moderate to severe disease who do not warrant ICU level of care but require hospital admission due to the extent of their illness. The authors of this study designed and conducted a pragmatic, partially randomized control trial to evaluate the possible benefit of methylprednisolone in hospitalized patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia.

December 2, 2019

Background: Recently there have been some observed trends in decreasing susceptibility among Strep pneumoniae isolates to antimicrobials used to treat community acquired pneumonia (CAP) (Resistance to oral penicillin and macrolides for Strep pneumoniae & macrolides and fluoroquinolones for Staph aureus).  New antibacterials are therefore needed to treat CAP because of growing antibacterial resistance. Lefamulin is the first pleuromutilin antibiotic approved for intravenous and oral use in humans. Both the intravenous and oral formulations were approved in August 2019 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat CAP.  It is active against the most common CAP-causing pathogens, including bacteria resistant to other antimicrobial classes. Lefamulin Evaluation Against Pneumonia 1 (LEAP 1) [1] looked at IV Lefamulin vs IV Moxifloxacin in adult patients with moderate to severe CAP and demonstrated noninferiority in that trial.   Given those results, LEAP 2 was performed to compare oral Lefamulin to oral Moxifloxacin in adult patients with moderate to severe CAP.

July 6, 2018

Background: Community acquired pneumonia (CAP), defined as lower bronchial tree infection in a patient that has not been hospitalized in the last 90 days is a commonly diagnosed disease. There are between 2-4 million episodes per year in the US with roughly 500,000 hospital admissions (Rosen’s). Most outpatients are treated with azithromycin (or another macrolide antibiotic) as this drug gives a simple treatment regimen (single drug, simple dosing, short course). However, the efficacy of this regimen has been questioned in recent years as resistance patterns shift.

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