Skin Anesthesia: Lidocaine vs Bupivacaine +/- Epinephrine

23 Apr
April 23, 2015

 

Skin AnesthesiaWhen selecting a local anesthetic agent for skin wounds I have historically been taught to use lidocaine to provide a faster onset, and to use bupivacaine for a longer duration of action.

It can be time consuming to find 0.5% Bupivacaine with epinephrine and 2% Lidocaine with Epinephrine to produce a final mixture of 1% Lidocaine and 0.25% Bupivacaine with Epinephrine.

  • If there is no difference in effect between these agents time could be saved when drawing up local anesthetics.

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April 2015 “Skeptical Edition” REBELCast

20 Apr
April 20, 2015

April 2015 "Skeptical Edition" REBELCastWelcome back to a special edition, or should I say “skeptical edition” of REBELCast. We have started to do something new by inviting guests onto the show to discuss papers in the literature they find interesting.  This month I had the pleasure of working with Ken Milne, an emergency room physician in Canada. Today, Ken and I are going to specifically discuss a new device that recently got FDA approval for CPR in Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA), and the question we are trying to answer is:

Is active Compression Decompression CPR with Augmentation of Negative Intrathoracic Pressure for Treatment of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest superior to standard CPR?

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Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol for Chest Pain Not Useful in a US Population?

16 Apr
April 16, 2015

Accelerated Diagnostic ProtocolThere are approximately 8 to 10 million patients coming to Emergency Departments (EDs) in the United States annually. In the US, we use a very liberal testing strategy in order to avoid acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients presenting with chest pain. This results in over 50% of ED patients with acute chest pain receiving serial cardiac biomarkers, stress testing, and cardiac angiography at an estimated cost of $10 to $13 billion annually and yet fewer than 10% of these patients are diagnosed with ACS.

The 2-hour accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADAPT) combines  0 and 2 hour cardiac troponin (cTn), electrocardiograms (ECGs), and an adapted Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) score to help identify ED patients safe for early discharge. Previous studies show that this strategy can identify as many as 20% of patients for early discharge with a high sensitivity of 97.9% to 99.7% for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 30 days. This ADP has yet to be tested in a US population until now.

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Do Patients with Posterior Epistaxis Managed by Posterior Packs Require ICU Admission?

13 Apr
April 13, 2015

Epistaxis MythsThis post is part 2 of epistaxis dogma. In the first post, we discussed the (dis)utility of prophylactic antibiotics in patients with epistaxis who require nasal packing. Here, we will take on dogma #2:

Dogma #2: Patients with posterior packs for epistaxis should be admitted to the ICU for continuous monitoring due to the risk of life-threatening bradydysrhythmias.

Unfortunately, the literature here is even sparser than with prophylactic antibiotics. An extensive literature search (paging research librarian) turned up two articles that were repeatedly cited. Read more →

Lidocaine + Bupivacaine vs Bupivacaine Alone for Digital Nerve Blocks

09 Apr
April 9, 2015

Digital Nerve BlocksWhen I first learned digital nerve blocks in the late 1990’s I was taught to mix Lidocaine and Bupivacaine 50/50 to provide faster onset (Lidocaine) and a longer duration of action (Bupivacaine). My use of two agents for digital nerve blocks was recently questioned by one of my colleagues.

Any time additional medications are drawn up into a syringe there is opportunity for error, and there is additional time added to the procedure. A review of the (limited) literature will try to answer the following questions:

  1. Does the addition of Lidocaine to Bupivacaine decrease the time to onset of anesthesia?
  2. Does the addition of Lidocaine to Bupivacaine decrease the pain of injection?
  3. Does the use of Lidocaine with Epinephrine prolong the duration of digital block long enough to obviate the need for Bupivacaine?

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April 2015 REBELCast

06 Apr
April 6, 2015

April 2015 REBELCastWelcome to the April 2015 REBELCast, where Swami, Matt, and I are going to tackle a couple of articles just published this year. Today we are going to specifically tackle:

  • Topic #1: Basic Life Support (BLS) vs Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) in Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA)
  • Topic #2: PROMISE Trial – Anatomic vs Functional Testing for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

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Do Patients with Epistaxis Managed by Nasal Packing Require Prophylactic Antibiotics?

30 Mar
March 30, 2015

EpistaxisEpistaxis is a common Emergency Department (ED) complaint with over 450,000 visits per year and a lifetime incidence of 60% (Gifford 2008, Pallin 2005). Posterior epistaxis is considerably less common than anterior epistaxis and represents about 5-10% of all presentations. Many patients with posterior epistaxis will be managed with a posterior pack and admitted for further monitoring. Traditional teaching argues that:

  1. Patients with nasal packs should be given prophylactic antibiotics to prevent serious infectious complications.
  2. Patients with posterior packs should be admitted to the ICU for cardiac monitoring as they are at risk for serious bradydysrhythmias.

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The Protocolised Management in Sepsis (ProMISe) Trial

17 Mar
March 17, 2015

ProMISeSince 2002, the surviving sepsis campaign (SSC) has stated that best practice in sepsis care includes: early recognition, source control, appropriate/timely antibiotic therapy, resuscitation with intravenous fluids (IVF) and vasoactive medications. Resuscitation of the septic patient in the emergency department has been largely based off the 2001 Rivers trial. This single center study’s focus was to optimize tissue oxygen delivery following several parameters including, central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and central venous oxygen saturation (SCVO2) to guide IVF, vasoactive medications, and packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Well today, part 3 of the sepsis trilogy was published in the saga of Early Goal Directed Therapy (EGDT) versus “usual” care. The 3 parts to this saga consist of:

  1. Protocolized Care for Early Septic Shock (ProCESS) – 31 Emergency Departments in the United States
  2. Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) – 51 Emergency Departments in Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Hong Kong, and Ireland
  3. The Protocolised Management in Sepsis (ProMISe) Trial – 56 Emergency Departments in the United Kingdom Read more →

The New Age of Sepsis Management

16 Mar
March 16, 2015

SepsisThere are more than 750,000 cases of severe sepsis and septic shock in the US each year.  Most patients who present with sepsis receive their initial care in the emergency department.  In 2001, there was a landmark study by Rivers et al that reported that among patients with severe sepsis or septic shock mortality was significantly lower among those who received a 6 hour protocol of Early Goal-Directed Therapy (EGDT) (i.e. 30.5% vs 46.5%). The premise of EGDT was that “usual care” lacked aggressive, timely assessment and treatment. The EGDT protocol used central venous catheterization (CVC) to monitor central venous pressure (CVP) and central venous oxygen saturation (SCVO2) to guide the use of intravenous fluids (IVFs), vasopressors, packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions, and dobutamine in order to achieve pre-specified physiological targets.  Since the publication of this landmark article, physicians have become more aggressive in the management of sepsis which raises the question of whether all elements of the protocol are still necessary.  Read more →

Epinephrine in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Poll

15 Mar
March 15, 2015

epinephrineRecently, I wrote a post on the use of epinephrine in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and this triggered some interesting discussion on twitter. Are we at a point that we can just stop using epinephrine in OHCA?  Has anyone stopped actually using epinephrine in OHCA and if so, why or why not? The evidence seems to point to no “good” neurologic benefit over basic life support (BLS).  I would love to hear more peoples thoughts on this. Read more →