Is ST-Segment Elevation in Lead aVR Getting Too Much Respect? with Amal Mattu

14 Mar
March 14, 2016

aVRLead aVR is a commonly ignored lead and I have even heard of it referred to as the Rodney Dangerfield of ECG leads as it gets no respect. I have anecdotally heard many EM physicians activate the cath lab for STE in lead aVR and many cardiologists say that these are not STEMI patients. So is lead aVR now getting too much respect? Well, I thought it would be a great idea to bring the great Amal Mattu on to the show to answer a few questions for us regarding STE in lead aVR.

If you don’t know Amal Mattu by now, I am not sure where you have been. Currently he is a tenured professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. He has presented at numerous national and international conferences on ECG interpretation, published several books on the topic and if you want more from him just checkout his site ecgweekly.comRead more →

Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Uncomplicated Skin Abscesses?

10 Mar
March 10, 2016

Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Uncomplicated Skin Abscesses?Background: It is well documented that the number of visits to the ED for abscesses is on the rise in the US, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) being the most common cause of purulent skin and soft-tissue infections. The primary treatment for cutaneous abscesses is incision and drainage (I&D). The prescription of antibiotics after this procedure is not straightforward. On one hand there is increased cost and possibly increased side effects, but on the other hand maybe antibiotics will increase eradication and improve treatment. What is known is that I&D alone will result in resolution in >80% of cases. So this begs the question, should we be empirically prescribing Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for uncomplicated skin abscesses after I&D? Read more →

Advice to the Graduating Resident – Anand Swaminathan

29 Feb
February 29, 2016

AdviceWe are getting closer to the end of the year and pretty soon 3rd year residents will be graduating and moving on to their first jobs as attending physicians.  My own residents have been asking for advice, and I thought this would be a great opportunity to ask some EM educators what their advice would be. Essentially, I asked each of them two basic questions and let them steal the show. For our inaugural first episode I asked Anand Swaminathan if he could give us some of his words of wisdom. Read more →

Sepsis 3.0

24 Feb
February 24, 2016

Sepsis 3.0Background: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is something that has been beat into the heads of medical students, residents, fellows, and all physicians in general. However, the derivation of SIRS occurred in 1991, where the focus was on the then-prevailing inflammatory response of the host immune system. In 2001, a task force recognized the limitations of these definitions but did not really offer alternatives due to a lack of supporting evidence. What we have been left with is the definitions of sepsis being largely unchanged for more than 2 decades, until now. Enter Sepsis 3.0. Read more →

Complications of Procedural Sedation

22 Feb
February 22, 2016

Procedural SedationBackground: As Emergency Department (ED) physicians it is not uncommon to give patients procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) to help facilitate painful procedures. Performing PSA requires close monitoring and is not without potential adverse events. There are numerous analgesic, sedative, and anesthetic agents that can be used in combination for PSA in the ED. Adverse event reporting for PSA has been heterogeneous. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine the incidence of adverse events during PSA in the ED, including the frequency of events with individual drugs and different drug combinations. Read more →

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