April 1, 2021

Background: Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are a common reason for medical visits in kids.  Most RTIs are self-limited and the addition of antibiotics rarely alters the course of disease. However, antibiotics are frequently prescribed for these conditions.  Antibiotic overuse is one of the main drivers of resistance to antimicrobial agents.  Additionally, antibiotic prescriptions place patients at risk for adverse events from the antibiotics themselves and makes parents believe they need to have their children seen for similar episodes in the future.

October 22, 2020

Background: Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a very common emergency department (ED) presentation, with “approximately 1.5 million pediatric outpatient visits and 200,000 admissions” each year (Benary).   Treatment for AGE is mainly supportive, utilizing rehydration therapy and antiemetic medications.  One common and well studied antiemetic is ondansetron, which has been shown to be effective at controlling vomiting and decreasing hospitalization rates in pediatric patients.  Despite its widespread use within the emergency department, there is significant variation in the use of ondansetron as a discharge prescription, with providers noting the fear of masking a worsening condition or missed diagnosis and thus preventing a necessary return visit.  

May 16, 2019

Essentials of Emergency Medicine 2019 is taking place at the Cosmopolitan Hotel/Casino in Las Vegas, NV. I was asked to give five lectures on varying topics and wanted to share what was discussed at each of these sessions.  If you haven't been to Essentials of Emergency Medicine, you need to add this conference to your list of conferences to attend.  The organizers pride themselves in discussing the latest practice-changing research and have meticulously designed content to maximize enjoyment and retention. In my humble opinion this conference is the quintessential medutainment extravaganza that applies learning theory principles, with amazing speakers, to provide you with the latest and greatest for clinical practice.

January 28, 2019

Diagnosis and management of concussion in children is part of our everyday bread and butter in the Emergency Department. Given the estimated 1.1 million - 1.9 million pediatric concussions we see annually in the United States, it is no wonder why. [1] We are well aware that pediatric concussions (more accurately termed mild traumatic brain injury, mTBI) occur most commonly from direct blunt head trauma, but they can also occur via indirect forces. Regardless of mechanism, concussions result in temporary neurologic and/or cognitive impairment that can last hours to days, with long-term sequelae potentially lasting weeks to months.
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