August 23, 2018

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula has become increasing popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  In part 1 we summarized how High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) works.  In part 2, we will discuss the main indications for its use in adult and pediatric patients.

August 23, 2018

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula has become increasing popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  In part 1 we summarized how High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) works.  In part 2, we will discuss the main indications for its use in adult and pediatric patients.

August 20, 2018

The use of heated and humidified high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) has become increasingly popular in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure through all age groups.  I first started using it as a pediatric intensive care fellow, but had little knowledge of how it actually worked.  I noticed a few years after using it successfully in children, mainly with severe bronchiolitis, that we began to use it in the adult intensive care unit as well.  It seems over the past several years many studies have come out reviewing the mechanisms of action as well as its use in a variety of conditions.  In this part we will summarize how it works and for part 2 we will discuss the main indications for its use in adult and pediatric patients.

April 9, 2018

Background: Bronchiolitis is an acute inflammatory injury of the distal smaller airways, most commonly caused by viral infections.  There have been a host of medications studied in the treatment of bronchiolitis, including steroids, albuterol, epinephrine, and  inhaled hypertonic saline, with none proving to be effective in treatment.  Oxygen therapy via high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as opposed to standard nasal prongs provides some positive airway pressure which decreases work of breathing, improves oxygenation, and rates of intubation.  The trial we are going to review today (The PARIS Trial) evaluated early high-flow oxygen therapy vs standard oxygen therapy in infants with bronchiolitis and hypoxemia in both the emergency department and general pediatric ward settings.

July 6, 2015

Welcome to the July 2015 REBELCast, where Swami, Matt, and I are going to talk oxygen. It is important to remember that oxygen is a drug, and just like any drug we prescribe to patients it has potential side effects.  Although there is a paucity of clinical trial data to support routine use of supplemental oxygen, most health care providers still put oxygen on patients for possible physiological benefits.  So with that introduction today we are going to specifically tackle:

  • Topic #1: The AVOID Trial - Supplemental O2 vs Room Air for STEMI
  • Topic #2: The FLORALI Trial - High Flow Nasal Cannula (HFNC) for Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure