December 2, 2019

Background: Recently there have been some observed trends in decreasing susceptibility among Strep pneumoniae isolates to antimicrobials used to treat community acquired pneumonia (CAP) (Resistance to oral penicillin and macrolides for Strep pneumoniae & macrolides and fluoroquinolones for Staph aureus).  New antibacterials are therefore needed to treat CAP because of growing antibacterial resistance. Lefamulin is the first pleuromutilin antibiotic approved for intravenous and oral use in humans. Both the intravenous and oral formulations were approved in August 2019 by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat CAP.  It is active against the most common CAP-causing pathogens, including bacteria resistant to other antimicrobial classes. Lefamulin Evaluation Against Pneumonia 1 (LEAP 1) [1] looked at IV Lefamulin vs IV Moxifloxacin in adult patients with moderate to severe CAP and demonstrated noninferiority in that trial.   Given those results, LEAP 2 was performed to compare oral Lefamulin to oral Moxifloxacin in adult patients with moderate to severe CAP.

January 23, 2019

Take Home Points
  1. Single dose oral dexamethasone is an excellent choice for asthma exacerbations. It takes away the compliance issue for patients who have trouble getting medications or filling medications once they leave the ED.
  2. Antibiotics aren’t always indicated in COPD exacerbations, but are used much more frequently than in asthma exacerbations because the structural changes in the patient’s lung lead to increased bacterial colonization. In general, if the patient has increased cough or sputum production, they probably would benefit from a course of antibiotics
  3. In general, azithro alone is no longer a good choice as solo covereage for community acquired pneumonia.  Adding either amoxicillin or cefdinir to you amoxicillin should get you good coverage of both strep pneumo and atypicals.

February 18, 2015

Background: Respiratory tract infections and pneumonia are the 3rd leading cause of death worldwide.  Although morbidity and mortality has improved slightly with the advent of antibiotics, there is still a significant long-term morbidity and mortality associated with this disorder.  It is well known that in pneumonia, there is an excess release of circulating inflammatory cytokines which cause further pulmonary dysfunction. Maybe the use of systemic corticosteroids, which have anti-inflammatory effects, could help attenuate this systemic inflammatory process and thus improve outcomes. So is there any benefit to adjunct prednisone therapy in community acquired pneumonia?
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