August 10, 2015

  You have just intubated a seizing eclamptic woman who is 34 weeks pregnant. As she is being prepped for transfer to the OB unit for an emergent C-section your nurse asks you what medications you would like for post intubation analgesia and sedation. You have limited recollection of whether Propofol crosses the placenta, and have legitimate concerns about Fentanyl’s chances of producing a ‘floppy baby’ for the OB team on delivery. The literature on the most appropriate post intubation analgesia / sedation package for late pregnancy patients is limited. The agents we are the most familiar with in the emergency department for post intubation sedation and analgesia are Fentanyl and Propofol. One reliable mantra for post intubation analgesia and sedation is 'Fentanyl is the sauce, and Propofol is the oregano', it would be great to be able to apply this mantra to the pregnant population also.

January 30, 2014

Women with undifferentiated abdominal pain and/or vaginal bleeding commonly present to the emergency department.  Many textbooks advocate for the pelvic exam as an essential part of the history and physical exam. Performance of this portion of the exam is time consuming to the physician and uncomfortable for the patient. It is with great regularity that emergency medicine physicians make clinical decisions based on information derived from it, but is this information reliable and does it effect the clinical plan of patients?

REBEL Review 3: Medications in Pregnancy

Created October 30, 2013 | Obstetrics and Gynecology | DOWNLOAD

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