November 18, 2019

Background Information: Therapeutic hypothermia is the use of targeted temperature management to reduce neurologic sequelae resulting from the severe ischemia-reperfusion injury that occurs during cardiac arrest primarily from shockable rhythms.1 Although a mainstay treatment in the Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines, its use has been widely debated as beneficial in improving neurologic outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients with non-shockable rhythms.2-7 Recent studies have also questioned the exact temperature at which patients should be cooled.8 The authors of this study sought to assess whether moderate therapeutic hypothermia, compared with targeted normothermia would improve neurologic outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients who had a non-shockable rhythm.

November 28, 2016

The use of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has become part of the routine care of patients after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) from cardiac arrest (Use of the phrase Targeted Temperature Management has become more accepted). It became much more accepted after two separate trials were published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002 showing a survival benefit and improved neurologic outcome with use of TH. (1,2) The use of TH has even been given a Level One recommendation by the American Heart Association for comatose post-arrest patients. (3) Uncertainties still remain, however, such as what optimal temperature to use, and most recommendations on specifics related to TH are based on observational studies and expert opinion. So what is the actual evidence behind the use of TH?
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