May 1, 2021

Background: Head up (HUP) CPR is an emerging concept.  The theory behind HUP is it allows for venous blood to drain from the brain to the heart thereby decreasing intracranial pressure and lowering the arterial/venous pressure waves which concuss the brain with each compression.  Additionally, conventional CPR increases vascular pressure in both the venous and arterial sides of the heart simultaneously which in turn increases intrathoracic and intracranial pressure which can impede cerebral blood flow and compromise coronary circulation.  All of these theories were evaluated and confirmed in animal models with very limited human trials. In order for HUP to work however, we have to be able to effectively pump blood up to the brain which is not typically achieved with conventional CPR (C-CPR). Active Compression Decompression with Impedance Threshold Devices (ACD-ITD) are one way to improve C-CPR.  They can theoretically help by reducing intracranial pressure (ICP), reduce the potential for concussion with every compression, increase cerebral perfusion pressure (CerPP) and coronary perfusion pressure (CorPP). However, with any new approach, we should always temper enthusiasm, as the realities of implementing them may actually not be helpful, and maybe even harmful.

April 6, 2020

Background: Epinephrine remains a staple in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA).  However, the optimal dose, timing, and route of administration are still unknown.  Standard dosing of epinephrine is 1mg every 3 to 5 minutes via the intravenous (IV) or intraosseous (IO) route. IO lines are quicker to establish and have a higher first-attempt success rate compared to IV access. Rapid placement and ease of use minimizes delays for critical patients requiring quick access. The literature, although methodologically limited, is mixed about the use of IV vs IO access for epinephrine in OHCA.

December 15, 2016

Background: The American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) give a Class I recommendation for activation of the cardiac catheterization lab in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) whom ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is present.  The evidence for early cardiac catheterization in patients after cardiac arrest, with ROSC and no STEMI is a bit more controversial.  The most recent 2015 AHA/ACC guidelines recommend, “it may be reasonable,” to perform an emergent cardiac catheterization in select patients without STEMI.

January 25, 2014

The goal of resuscitation in cardiac arrest is to respond in a timely, effective manner that leads to good patient outcomes.  Resuscitation is not taking an ACLS and BLS course and going through the motions of a code. There have been several studies looking at the quality of intubation and CPR, and their association with good patient outcomes.
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