October 2016 REBEL Cast: IDSA Pneumonia Update

10 Oct
October 10, 2016

pneumoniaEvery few years we get updates in the guidelines based on new evidence. Guidelines give us a framework to work with in the treatment of disease processes, such as pneumonia. The last Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) guidelines update on the treatment of pneumonia came from 2005, but recently, the new 2016 guidelines were just published. This was a massive 51 page summary that starts off by saying:

“It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients.  They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations.  IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be VOLUNTARY, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient’s individual circumstances.” Read more →

Critical Care Updates: Resuscitation Sequence Intubation – pH Kills (Part 3 of 3)

03 Oct
October 3, 2016

Resuscitation Sequence Intubation - pH Kills

This blog post is the third part of a series of 3, on a recent lecture I was asked to give  on Critical Care Updates: Resuscitation Sequence Intubation. This talk was mostly derived from a podcast by Scott Weingart (Twitter: @EMCrit) where he talked about the physiologic killers during preintubation and perintubation. In this podcast, Scott mentions the HOp killers: Hypotension, Hypoxemia, and Metabolic Acidosis (pH) as the physiologic causes of pre-intubation/peri-intubation morbidity and mortality. Taking care of these critically ill patients that require intubation can be a high stress situation, with little room for error.  In part three of this series we will discuss some useful strategies at the bedside to help us not worsen pre-intubation/peri-intubation metabolic acidosis.
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Critical Care Updates: Resuscitation Sequence Intubation – Hypoxemia Kills (Part 2 of 3)

29 Sep
September 29, 2016

Resuscitation Sequence Intubation - Hypoxemia Kills

This blog post is the second part of a series of 3, on a recent lecture I was asked to give  on Critical Care Updates: Resuscitation Sequence Intubation. This talk was mostly derived from a podcast by Scott Weingart (Twitter: @EMCrit) where he talked about the physiologic killers during preintubation and perintubation. In this podcast, Scott mentions the HOp killers: Hypotension, Hypoxemia, and Metabolic Acidosis (pH) as the physiologic causes of pre-intubation/peri-intubation morbidity and mortality. Taking care of these critically ill patients that require intubation can be a high stress situation, with little room for error.  In part two of this series we will discuss some useful strategies at the bedside to help us reduce pre-intubation/peri-intubation hypoxemia.
Read more →

Critical Care Updates: Resuscitation Sequence Intubation – Hypotension Kills (Part 1 of 3)

26 Sep
September 26, 2016

Resuscitation Sequence Intubation - Hypotension Kills

This blog post is the first part of a series of 3, on a recent lecture I was asked to give  on Critical Care Updates: Resuscitation Sequence Intubation. This talk was mostly derived from a podcast by Scott Weingart (Twitter: @EMCrit) where he talked about the physiologic killers during preintubation and perintubation. In this podcast, Scott mentions the HOp killers: Hypotension, Hypoxemia, and Metabolic Acidosis (pH) as the physiologic causes of pre-intubation/peri-intubation morbidity and mortality. Taking care of these critically ill patients that require intubation can be a high stress situation, with little room for error.  In part one of this series we will discuss some useful strategies at the bedside to help us reduce pre-intubation/peri-intubation hypotension.
Read more →

Beyond ACLS: Cognitively Offloading During a Cardiac Arrest

22 Sep
September 22, 2016

Beyond ACLSToday I am giving a talk at the 25th National Emergency Medicine Symposium by Kaiser Permanente in Maui, HI.  The focus of this talk was on how to cognitively offload our minds as we are running a resuscitation. ACLS provides us with a framework in treating adult victims of Cardiac Arrest (CA) or other cardiopulmonary emergencies. This helps get providers who don’t commonly deal with CA, to improve things, such as the quality of CPR, minimizing interruptions during CPR for pulse checks, and the timing/dosing of epinephrine. Emergency Medicine (EM) and the prehospital world are different than many environments in medicine. We get minimal information at the time of patient arrival while at the same time the disease process that is taking place has not quite defined itself.  We are constantly expected to acutely manage and resuscitate anyone who comes in our doors 24-7-365, many times without crucial information. Our job therefore should be to ensure coronary and cerebral perfusion are at their highest quality, but also simultaneously putting the pieces of the puzzle together to figure out why our patient is in CA. It can be very difficult to do both and many times we sacrifice one for the other. It is therefore important to cognitively offload ourselves during the resuscitation of our patients in CA and focus our attention on why they are in CA. As a disclosure for this lecture I did state that some of the recommendations made have evidence to support them and others are more theoretical and certainly up for discussion. Read more →

September 2016 REBEL Cast: Refractory Ventricular Fibrillation

05 Sep
September 5, 2016

Refractory Ventricular FibrillationBackground: Welcome back to the September 2016 REBEL Cast. We are back with another episode and I am super excited about this episode because we are going to talk about two papers just published in the Resuscitation Journal on management of refractory ventricular fibrillation. It is a well known fact that the cornerstones for survival from Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) have always been early, high quality CPR and early defibrillation in patients with shockable rhythms (i.e. Ventricular Fibrillation/Ventricular Tachycardia). Some patients with shockable rhythms may be refractory to standard defibrillation therapy (i.e. refractory VF). Even more frustrating, there is truly a dearth of data on what to do with these patients. One strategy that has been reported more and more in the literature is double sequential defibrillation (DSD).

Another issue in cardiac arrest patients is we frequently give boluses of 1mg epinephrine every 3 – 5 minutes as is outlined in the ACLS guidelines.  When patients have minimal cardiac output, the buildup of catecholamines may potentially cause refractory ventricular fibrillation (RVF).  This could be due to an increase myocardial oxygen consumption causing an increase in myocardial ischemia, and ultimately more difficulty in successful defibrillation.  But maybe by blocking the beta-adrenergic receptors in the myocardium, we can block the beta effects of the catecholamines and potentially increase the chances of successful sustained ROSC.

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Upcoming Conferences Presented By The Teaching Institute

02 Sep
September 2, 2016

The Teaching Institute LogoThis year has been an exciting year for us at The Teaching Institute (TTI).  We have had some great medical education conferences at some pretty amazing places, including Cape Town, South Africa and Melbourne, Australia.  The rest of 2016 and 2017 promise to be just as exciting if not more so.  TTI is dedicated to helping others learn how to be better educators and committed to creativity and innovation.  Our motto is simple: better educators equals better patient care. If you haven’t been able to participate in any of our courses, it’s not too late.  You can still sign up for several of our courses that are coming up. Read more →

The Fragility Index: Assessing Usefulness of Randomized Clinical Trials

22 Aug
August 22, 2016

Fragility IndexBackground: In the pyramid of evidence based medicine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered to be one of the most reliable study designs when evaluating the cause and effect of treatment modalities. When evaluating randomized controlled trials, we often look for statistical significance of a study to determine if a treatment has an effect.  Statistical significance means that the result of a study is unlikely to occur by chance alone.  The value assigned to a statistically significant result is typically a p-value less than 0.05. Read more →

Euglycemic DKA: It’s not a Myth

18 Aug
August 18, 2016

Euglycemic DKABackground: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is traditionally defined as a triad of hyperglycemia (>250mg/dL), anion gap acidosis, and increased plasma ketones. There is another entity that providers must be aware of known as euglycemic DKA (euDKA), which is essentially DKA without the hyperglycemia (Serum glucose <200 mg/dL). Euglycemic DKA is a rare entity that mostly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but can possibly occur in type 2 diabetes as well. The exact mechanism of euDKA is not entirely known, but has been associated with partial treatment of diabetes, carbohydrate food restriction, alcohol intake, and inhibition of gluconeogenesis. euDKA, can also be associated with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor medications.  These medications first came onto the market in 2013 and are FDA approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, however many physicians use them off-label for type I diabetes due to their ability to improve average glucose levels, reduce glycemic variability without increasing hypoglycemia, and finally promote weight loss. Read more →

REBELCast: The PROCAMIO Trial – IV Procainamide vs IV Amiodarone for the Acute Treatment of Stable Wide Complex Tachycardia

15 Aug
August 15, 2016

The PROCAMIO TrialBackground: In the ACLS guidelines stable Ventricular Tachycardia (VT) can be treated with either IV amiodarone or IV procainamide, as the drugs of choice. This has been given a class II recommendation, but there has not been a controlled prospective trial to base the use of one drug over the other in the clinical setting. Despite both medications having a class II recommendation, both clinically and anecdotally it appears that amiodarone is the preferred agent in clinical practice. Read more →

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