Topical Pain Control for Corneal Abrasions

05 Oct
October 5, 2017

Corneal abrasions account for 10% of all ocular complaints, and are the most common cause of ocular trauma (Alotaibi 2011, Bhatia 2013).  The diagnosis of corneal abrasions typically involves fluorescein staining of the eye and visualization of the abrasion via slit lamp exam. This review focuses specifically on pain control for corneal abrasions.

Although corneal abrasions typically heal within 24-72 hours without complications, the pain in the acute phase is usually significant (Wilson 2004).  Treatments described include patching, topical anesthetics, topical NSAIDS, cycloplegics or oral analgesics.  Utilization of topical anesthetics has been described in a previous post.  Oral analgesics are usually prescribed as a rescue modality when topical treatment is ineffective at managing pain.  Read more →

The YEARS Study – Simplified Diagnostic Approach to PE

28 Sep
September 28, 2017

Background: The clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) can be challenging given its variable presentation, requiring dependence on objective testing. Decision instruments such as PERC and the Wells’ score help stratify patients to low or high probability, enabling focused use of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for diagnosis. However, despite these algorithms, there is evidence of increasing use of CTPA along with diminishing diagnostic rate (less than 10%). This combination results in the overdiagnosis of subsegmental PEs, unnecessary exposure to radiation, false positive results and the potential for contrast-induced nephropathy. The YEARS study aims to present a simplified algorithm for evaluation with a two-tiered D-dimer threshold to reduce the numbers of CTPA in all age groups. Read more →

Is Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN) Really Not a Thing?

25 Sep
September 25, 2017

Background: One of the most common imaging modalities used in the emergency department (ED) today is computed tomography (CT) scans using intravenous radiocontrast agents. Use of IV contrast can help increase visualization of pathology as compared to non-contrast CTs. However, many patients do not get IV contrast due to fear of contrast induced nephropathy.  Furthermore, waiting for renal function values delays the care of patients and prolongs time spent in the ED with a potential to increase adverse effects on patient centered outcomes due to delays. Read more →

The DETO2X Trial: Do Patients with AMI Need Supplemental O2?

21 Sep
September 21, 2017

Background: Each year approximately 790,000 Americans suffer an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (Benjamin 2017). Traditional treatment for an acute myocardial infarction has included morphine, oxygen, nitroglycerine and aspirin (MONA) with interventions such as percutaneous coronary intervention providing more definitive management. There has been little data from randomized control studies that supports the use of oxygen in AMI. Recent studies such as the AVOID trial suggest that hyperoxia results in harm while a 2016 Cochrane Review suggest no benefit in supplemental oxygen. (Stub 2015, Cabello 2016). There has, however, not been a large randomized control study comparing supplemental O2 to ambient air with patient centered outcomes until the DETO2X-AMI trial. Read more →

Can We Agree on Cardiac Standstill?

18 Sep
September 18, 2017

Background: Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS) has gained wider use in resuscitation of patients presenting with cardiac arrest. POCUS can play an important role in determining the etiology of arrest as well as being used to determine the presence or absence of mechanical activity. The REASON study demonstrated that patients with PEA or asystole without cardiac activity on POCUS are extremely unlikely to survive to hospital discharge though this study did not investigate the more important question of a survival with a good neurologic outcome. (Gaspari 2016). In light of this as well as other evidence, some have proposed that the absence of cardiac activity may be adequate to declare resuscitation futility and stop resuscitative efforts. However, there is a lack of agreement on what defines cardiac activity (see table 1). Due to this, and other factors, the level of agreement between physicians in interpretation of cardiac standstill is unknown. Read more →

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