Tag Archive for: stroke

PRISMS Trial: Alteplase vs. Aspirin in Minor Stroke

06 Sep
September 6, 2018

Background: Despite serious concerns about the role of alteplase in the management of acute ischemic stroke including, but not limited to, significant conflicts of interest, unbalanced baseline patient characteristics, systematic devaluation of contrary data, lack of reproduced benefit and low fragility index, it remains standard care for patients presenting with symptoms of acute ischemic stroke within 3 (or 4.5 depending on system) hours of onset of symptoms. Though the NINDS studies only showed benefit in a specific subgroup of patients, subsequent work has endeavored to expand the target group in a classic example of indication creep. Patients with minor CVA (NIHSS < 5 without disabling features or, essentially mRS 0-1) represent one such subgroup in which alteplase is often not employed due mainly in part to the perception of minimal benefit with continued potential for harm (i.e. anaphylaxis, intracranial hemorrhage). Alteplase supporters argue that minor stroke patients should still get the drug as it not only may reduce symptoms but can also prevent deterioration. The evidence for this viewpoint is both extremely limited and of poor methodologic quality. Read more →

Stroke Workflow in 2018

22 Apr
April 22, 2018

With the publication of the DAWN and DEFUSE-3 trials came a new era in stroke management.  We have discussed the specific literature pertaining to endovascular therapy on REBEL EM before in our 2hour CME activity HERE.  Along with the two new publications came the 2018 AHA/ASA guidelines for endovascular therapy in acute ischemic stroke.  Anand Swaminathan and myself wanted to place a stand alone post on the workflow of stroke in 2018.  Read more →

Does it Take a VAN to Identify Emergent Large Vessel Occlusion (ELVO) in Ischemic Stroke?

27 Mar
March 27, 2018

Background: Over the last three years, we have seen the rise of neurointerventional therapies for patients with ischemic strokes due to large vessel occlusions (LVOs). This group of strokes typically includes patients with occlusion of the distal intracranial carotid artery, middle cerebral artery or anterior cerebral artery. Rapid identification of these patients both in the prehospital setting as well as in the emergency department (ED) may be beneficial as it can lead to mobilization of necessary resources and ordering of proper investigations (CT perfusion, MRI/MRA). While there are a number of clinical scoring systems in place to identify patients with LVO, none are ideal. The authors investigate the utility of the vision, aphasia, neglect (VAN) assessment for this purpose. Read more →

The ENCHANTED Trial: Is Low-Dose the Right Dose for Intravenous tPA in Acute Ischemic Stroke?

26 May
May 26, 2016

The ENCHANTED TrialBackground: Despite continued debate on the efficacy of alteplase (tPA), it currently remains one of the major interventions directed at patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. The current standard dose of the drug is 0.9 mg/kg given over 1 hour. It is unclear whether lower doses would be equally effective in increasing good neurologic outcomes after stroke while simultaneously decreasing the rate of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); the most serious side effect. Evidence showing that lower doses of tPA are non-inferior to standard-dose tPA could lead to a shift in treatment.  Read more →

Ischemic Stroke Treatment Archive

09 Nov
November 9, 2015

Ischemic Stroke Treatment ArchiveI recently returned from the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Conference which took place from Oct. 26th – 29th, 2015 in Boston, MA.  There were really a lot of amazing talks by so many amazing speakers but one lecture in particular by David Newman, of SMART EM and The NNT fame, made me realize that there is just so much research on treatment of ischemic stroke, that I can’t even keep them straight.  So what I thought I would do is create an archive of all that research and continue to add to the list as more research is released.  I don’t know about you, but I find myself spending lots of time looking this information up every time I need it.  Read more →