Tag Archive for: Lidocaine

IV Lidocaine for Renal Colic: Another Opioid Sparing Option?

06 Dec
December 6, 2016

renal-colicBackground : For anyone who has taken care of a patient with renal colic, the agony they experience is indelible.  I have had several female patients even tell me that the pain is worse than child birth.  Treatment of renal colic comes down to two key components: treatment of pain and expediting passage of the stone.  Many medications have been tested for the former, and we have discussed the latter on our blog before (HERE and HERE). We had a recent resident journal club discussing a trial comparing IV lidocaine (1.5mg/kg) vs IV morphine (0.1mg/kg) for treatment of pain. Read more →

ALPS: Amiodarone, Lidocaine or Placebo Study in OHCA

25 Apr
April 25, 2016

ALPSBackground: Many Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest (OHCA) are attributable to ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VT). Both are said to be treatable presentations of OHCA, due to their responsiveness to defibrillation. VF and VT can persist or recur after defibrillation with an inverse relationship between the duration of OHCA, the recurrences of arrhythmias, and ultimately resuscitation outcomes.

Amiodarone and lidocaine are both recommended by the advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) guidelines to help promote successful defibrillation in refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia and to prevent recurrences. In previous randomized controlled trials patients receiving amiodarone vs placebo or lidocaine in OHCA were more likely to have return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and to survive to hospital admission. However the effects of amiodarone on survival to hospital discharge or neurologic outcome still remain uncertain. Should we be using anti-dysrhythmic drugs in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Read more →

Skin Anesthesia: Lidocaine vs Bupivacaine +/- Epinephrine

23 Apr
April 23, 2015

 

Skin AnesthesiaWhen selecting a local anesthetic agent for skin wounds I have historically been taught to use lidocaine to provide a faster onset, and to use bupivacaine for a longer duration of action.

It can be time consuming to find 0.5% Bupivacaine with epinephrine and 2% Lidocaine with Epinephrine to produce a final mixture of 1% Lidocaine and 0.25% Bupivacaine with Epinephrine.

  • If there is no difference in effect between these agents time could be saved when drawing up local anesthetics.

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Lidocaine + Bupivacaine vs Bupivacaine Alone for Digital Nerve Blocks

09 Apr
April 9, 2015

Digital Nerve BlocksWhen I first learned digital nerve blocks in the late 1990’s I was taught to mix Lidocaine and Bupivacaine 50/50 to provide faster onset (Lidocaine) and a longer duration of action (Bupivacaine). My use of two agents for digital nerve blocks was recently questioned by one of my colleagues.

Any time additional medications are drawn up into a syringe there is opportunity for error, and there is additional time added to the procedure. A review of the (limited) literature will try to answer the following questions:

  1. Does the addition of Lidocaine to Bupivacaine decrease the time to onset of anesthesia?
  2. Does the addition of Lidocaine to Bupivacaine decrease the pain of injection?
  3. Does the use of Lidocaine with Epinephrine prolong the duration of digital block long enough to obviate the need for Bupivacaine?

Read more →

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