Tag Archive for: FOAMed

Today I Learned: A Daily Dose of #FOAMed 1.0

12 Nov
November 12, 2018

In October 2016, I was exposed to the vast world of Free Open Access Medical Education and MedTwitter. I was astounded and inspired by the different educators who were trying to make learning easier. The Knowledge Translation (KT) gap was being vastly shortened by some very smart people who took to social media to educate the rest of the world. Although there were knowledge bombs in all areas of medicine, I was particularly drawn to the ones most relevant to emergency medicine and critical care.

Each day in 2017, I used Twitter to share a few pearls with the world as my contribution to #FOAMed. I included the hashtag #TodayILearned (Today I Learned) so I could keep track of them to use for future projects. Here are just a few of those pearls:

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Got FOAM?

05 Oct
October 5, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-09-26 at 7.29.36 AMI recently gave a talk at my old alma mater (Texas A&M College of Medicine) on creating a Professional and Scholarly Community with FOAM in early September of 2015.  One of the things I was most amazed by was how many people had not heard of the concept of FOAM, but more importantly the number of questions I received after my talk on how to get started and how to consume FOAM.  Now many people in the FOAM world have posted blog posts, videos, and even podcasts on how to do this, but I thought I would write a blog post on how I keep up and stay organized for anyone who is new to the FOAM world or if someone simply asks you how to get started feel free to just refer them here. Read more →

From Hippocrates to Osler to FOAM

04 Apr
April 4, 2014

FOAM LogoAs many know Free Open Access Med(ical Ed)ucation (FOAM) is a concept that was developed in June 2012 at a pub in Ireland. Since its creation FOAM has developed into a collection of constantly evolving, collaborative, and interactive resources and tools with one main objective…to make the world a better place. At the heart of FOAM is the philosophy that high-quality medical education should be free and accessible to all who care for patients and to those who teach the art and science of medicine. Recently, I watched a video from the 2013 Social Media And Critical Care (SMACC) Conference given by Joe Lex that made me realize although the acronym only came into being recently, maybe the concept had historical origins (From Hippocrates to Osler to FOAM).

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