Tag Archive for: DVT

LMWH in Cancer-Related VTE (CLOT Study)

20 Sep
September 20, 2018

Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs frequently in patient with cancer. Treatment in this group entails a number of challenges including a higher rate of thrombosis recurrence and a higher risk of bleeding. Standard therapy in 2018 for both symptomatic and asymptomatic VTE is with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) based on this study. Prior to 2003, patients were treated with warfarin after bridging with either unfractionated or LMWH. This approach requires frequent monitoring due to unpredictable anticoagulation levels associated with drug interactions, malnutrition and vomiting. Due to these issues, treatment with LMWH alone may be both more efficacious as well as preferred by patients. Read more →

Edoxaban in Cancer-Associated VTE

30 Aug
August 30, 2018

Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs frequently in patient with cancer. Treatment in this group entails a number of challenges including a higher rate of thrombosis recurrence and a higher risk of bleeding. Standard therapy at this time for both symptomatic and asymptomatic VTE is with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) based on results from the CLOT trial (Lee 2003). In non-cancer patients, new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) like  rivaroxaban have been shown to be effective in treatment without increasing bleeding events. The NOACs also add ease of use for the patient. Though these agents are frequently used in the treatment of cancer-associated VTE, there is a dearth of evidence supporting this practice. Read more →

The CACTUS Trial: Anticoagulation for Symptomatic Calf Deep Vein Thrombosis?

12 Dec
December 12, 2016

cactus-trialBackground: The optimal management of isolated calf deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is not completely clear, based on the available evidence. The authors of this paper state up to 50% of all lower extremity DVTs are infra-popliteal. Because there is not a lot of robust evidence to guide us on the best diagnostic and therapeutic treatments, a huge variation in practice is seen. To help try and answer these questions the authors of this paper performed the Compression versus Anticoagulant treatment and compression in symptomatic Calf Thrombosis diagnosed by UltraSound – CACTUS Trial. Read more →

Should I Stay or Should I Go: Outpatient Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism

05 Dec
December 5, 2016

venous-thromboembolismBackground: The care of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in the US with an increasingly large percentage of patients being discharged home from the Emergency Department (ED).  It wasn’t too long ago that all patients diagnosed with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) would be admitted for anticoagulation.  Some of the reasons for this were lack of literature to support outpatient therapy in the US, inability to arrange outpatient follow up, and, of course, medicolegal concerns.  Dr. Jeff Kline, one of the thought leaders in VTE, advocates for the outpatient treatment of “low-risk” patients using a modified Hestia criteria supplemented with additional criteria (POMPE-C) for patients with active cancer.  This publication is the initial results of his rivaroxaban-based treatment protocol. Read more →

Age Adjusted D-Dimer Testing

28 Apr
April 28, 2014

ThromboembolismD-dimer testing is sensitive for thrombus formation, and in patients who are not high risk, this test is used to rule-out venous thromboembolism. D-dimer has been shown to increase with age, which can cause a lower specificity (i.e. more false positive tests) in older patients.  Specificity can range from 49 – 67% in patients ≤ 50 years of age, but in older patients (i.e. ≥ 80 years of age) the specificity is quoted as 0 – 18%. The result of this is, older patients often have more diagnostic imaging, but a higher cut-off may lead to increased false negative cases (i.e. missed VTE) and make this strategy less safe. So could age adjusted d-dimer testing increase specificity without affecting sensitivity?

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