Archive for category: Mythbuster

Beyond ACLS: Is It Time to Abandon Epinephrine in Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest?

11 Mar
March 11, 2015

Epinephrine is widely used and recommended by Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but its effectiveness in neurologic outcomes has never been truly established.  To verify effectiveness of epinephrine confounders, such as patients, CPR quality, CPR by bystanders, time from call to arrival at scene or hospital, and much much more, […]

Is Kayexalate Useful in the Treatment of Hyperkalemia in the Emergency Department?

02 Feb
February 2, 2015

Background: Hyperkalemia is the most common electrolyte disorder seen in the Emergency Department and treatment of hyperkalemia is core knowledge of EM training for interns and focuses on: 1) Stabilization of cardiac myocytes with calcium salts 2) Temporary shifting of potassium into cells (insulin, beta agonists, normal saline,       magnesium, sodium bicarbonate) 3) Removal […]

January 2015 REBELCast

10 Jan
January 10, 2015

Welcome to the January 2015 REBELCast, where Swami and I are going to tackle a very important scenario that comes up in the daily practice of not only Emergency Medicine, but also in Medicine.  Today we are going to specifically tackle one topic: Topic: Is the use of cephalosporin antibiotics in patients with a history of […]

Do Patients with Strep Throat Need to Be Treated with Antibiotics?

05 Jan
January 5, 2015

Background: Streptococcal pharyngitis is a common presentation to primary care and Emergency Department physicians. Every year, 10 million patients in the United States are treated with antibiotics for pharyngitis. However, less than 10% of these patients actually have strep pharyngitis (Barnett 2013). Prescribing of antibiotics for these patients centers on three arguments: Antibiotics reduce symptomology Antibiotics […]

Does Use of Tamsulosin in Renal Colic Facilitate Stone Passage?

07 Aug
August 7, 2014

Renal colic is a common ED presentation. Rarely does a day go by that we don’t see a patient rocking and rolling in acute renal colic. Dan Firestone makes an impassioned argument against the use of CT scanning for diagnosis of renal colic so I won’t address that here. Once we make a diagnosis, our […]

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