Archive for category: Mythbuster

The Tamiflu Debacle

24 Oct
October 24, 2018

Background:  Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a neuraminidase inhibitor, was approved by the FDA in 1999.  The majority of the evidence supporting the use of the medication came from trials funded by Roche, the maker of the drug. Safety issues with the drug began sprouting up in 2009, due to case reports in Japan of neuropsychiatric events and […]

The Death of MONA in ACS: Part II – Oxygen

05 Nov
November 5, 2017

Background: The first report for supplemental oxygen for angina was in 1900, and since then oxygen therapy has been a commonly used treatment of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI).  The reason for this is the belief that supplemental oxygen will increase oxygen delivery to ischemic myocardium and help reduce myocardial injury.  This belief is […]

The Death of MONA in ACS: Part I – Morphine

05 Nov
November 5, 2017

Background: Morphine is a commonly used medication in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) to help relieve pain which in turn can help reduce sympathetic tone.  Over the past few years however, there has been some concern raised about the drug-drug interactions with antiplatelet agents causing impaired platelet inhibition as well as an association with worsened clinical […]

Is Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN) Really Not a Thing?

25 Sep
September 25, 2017

Background: One of the most common imaging modalities used in the emergency department (ED) today is computed tomography (CT) scans using intravenous radiocontrast agents. Use of IV contrast can help increase visualization of pathology as compared to non-contrast CTs. However, many patients do not get IV contrast due to fear of contrast induced nephropathy.  Furthermore, […]

Urinary Retention: Rapid Drainage or Gradual Drainage to Avoid Complications?

04 Apr
April 4, 2017

Background: The treatment of urinary retention is pretty straightforward; place either a Foley catheter or suprapubic catheter to decompress the bladder.  What is less clear, and more often debated, is if we need to clamp the catheter after 200 – 1000mLs of urine output or just allow complete drainage.  Historic teaching has been to do […]