Archive for category: Resuscitation

REBEL Cast Ep57 – Cardiac Arrest Sonographic Assessment (CASA) with Lead Author Kevin Gardner, MD

25 Jul
July 25, 2018

Background: In the ED, POCUS has become one of the most important tools in discovering both the diagnosis and in the management of critically ill patients.  cardiac arrest, is ultimately as sick as a person can get in the spectrum of critical illness.  I mean how can someone be deader than dead, right?  There has been […]

REBEL Cast Ep56 – PARAMEDIC-2: Time to Abandon Epinephrine in OHCA?

20 Jul
July 20, 2018

Background: Epinephrine(adrenaline) has been used in advanced life support in cardiac arrest since the early 1960s. Despite the routine recommendation for its use, evidence to support administration is less than ideal.  Although it is clear from multiple observational studies that epinephrine improves return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and short-term survival, most evidence suggests an absence of […]

How Do You FEEL About Echo in Cardiac Arrest?

13 Jul
July 13, 2018

Background: Focused use of ultrasound in resuscitation of patients with shock and cardiac arrest has become increasingly embraced in both the emergency department (ED) as well as in the prehospital setting. Application of ultrasound, particularly of echocardiography, has the potential to identify treatable causes of shock and arrest, identify shockable rhythms and identify the presence of […]

Is Ketamine Contraindicated in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders?

03 Jul
July 3, 2018

Background: In recent years, ketamine use has dramatically increased in the Emergency Department (ED). There are four major indications for the use of ketamine in the ED: analgesia with low dose ketamine (LDK), induction for rapid sequence intubation, procedural sedation and sedation of the agitated patient. A number of relative contraindications for ketamine exist though […]

REBEL Cast Ep 54: What the Heck is Pseudo-PEA?

27 Jun
June 27, 2018

Background: Pulseless electrical activity (PEA) is an organized electrical activity without a palpable pulse.  1/3 of cardiac arrest cases will be pulseless electrical activity and the overall prognosis of these patients is worse than patients who have shockable rhythms (ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia).  It can be a challenge to decide when to terminate or […]