Archive for category: Clinical

Acute Pancreatitis

12 Oct
October 12, 2017

Acute Pancreatitis Background: Definition: Acute inflammatory process of the pancreas; a retroperitoneal organ with endocrine and exocrine function. Epidimiology (Rosen’s 2018) US Incidence: 5 – 40/100,000 Mortality: 4-7% Progression to severe disease: 10-15% of cases (mortality in this subset 20-50%) Etiology: Alcohol (~ 35% of cases) Gallstones (~ 45% of cases) Medications/toxins Hypertriglyceridemia Non-gallstone Obstruction […]

Do Patients with Opioid Dependence Benefit from Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment Initiation in the Emergency Department?

09 Oct
October 9, 2017

Background: North America’s current opioid crisis, much of it iatrogenic (2), has led to significant increases in ED visits associated with opioids (3). These patients often present after poisoning, in withdrawal, or with other health issues associated with their disease. It is well accepted that Opioid Replacement Therapy (ORT), namely, methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone, are successful harm […]

Topical Pain Control for Corneal Abrasions

05 Oct
October 5, 2017

Corneal abrasions account for 10% of all ocular complaints, and are the most common cause of ocular trauma (Alotaibi 2011, Bhatia 2013).  The diagnosis of corneal abrasions typically involves fluorescein staining of the eye and visualization of the abrasion via slit lamp exam. This review focuses specifically on pain control for corneal abrasions. Although corneal […]

The YEARS Study – Simplified Diagnostic Approach to PE

28 Sep
September 28, 2017

Background: The clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) can be challenging given its variable presentation, requiring dependence on objective testing. Decision instruments such as PERC and the Wells’ score help stratify patients to low or high probability, enabling focused use of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for diagnosis. However, despite these algorithms, there is evidence of increasing […]

Is Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN) Really Not a Thing?

25 Sep
September 25, 2017

Background: One of the most common imaging modalities used in the emergency department (ED) today is computed tomography (CT) scans using intravenous radiocontrast agents. Use of IV contrast can help increase visualization of pathology as compared to non-contrast CTs. However, many patients do not get IV contrast due to fear of contrast induced nephropathy.  Furthermore, […]

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