Archive for category: Clinical

Icatibant Doesn’t Improve Outcomes in ACE-I Induced Angioedema

22 Jun
June 22, 2017

Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors (ACE-I) are prescribed to millions of patients in the US. Though they are relatively safe, upper airway angioedema is one of the life-threatening adverse effects that we see frequently in the Emergency Department. Though this disorder is routinely treated with medications for anaphylaxis (i.e. epinephrine, histamine blockers, corticosteroids) the underlying mechanism […]

Targeted Temperature Management in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: 33°C or 36°C?

19 Jun
June 19, 2017

Background: In 2002, the New England Journal of Medicine published two studies that changed the management of post-cardiac arrest patients by showing improved outcomes in patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia (32°C-34°C) for at least 24 hours. (Bernard 2002, Hypothermia 2002).  The landscape changed again in 2013 with the publication of the Targeted Temperature Management (TTM) trial […]

Alternative Headache Therapies

15 Jun
June 15, 2017

Background: Presentations to the Emergency Department for acute headache are remarkably common, with more than 2 million visits each year in the United States (Goldstein 2006). Emergency clinicians are tasked with dual roles of excluding life-threatening pathology while rendering effective pain relief and symptomatic care. Treatment patterns for isolated benign headache are widely variable, reflecting the […]

Is Amiodarone Dead?

12 Jun
June 12, 2017

Background: Amiodarone is a class III antidysrhythmic first released for human use in 1962. As with other drugs in this class, amiodarone acts by blocking potassium channels thus prolonging the action potential. This, in turn, leads to a lengthening of depolarization of the atria and ventricles. The drug spread rapidly through US hospitals as it was […]

Initial Antibiotic Choice in Uncomplicated Cellulitis

08 Jun
June 8, 2017

Background: Cellulitis is a common emergency department (ED) presentation. Despite the fact that diagnosis remains relatively straight forward, complexity remains in management in terms of the causative agent and appropriate antibiotic regimen. Though beta-hemolytic Streptococci are the most common causative agents there is increasing prevalence of community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Cephalexin has long […]

Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE