Archive for category: Clinical

Initial Antibiotic Choice in Uncomplicated Cellulitis

08 Jun
June 8, 2017

Background: Cellulitis is a common emergency department (ED) presentation. Despite the fact that diagnosis remains relatively straight forward, complexity remains in management in terms of the causative agent and appropriate antibiotic regimen. Though beta-hemolytic Streptococci are the most common causative agents there is increasing prevalence of community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Cephalexin has long […]

Should You Give Albumin in Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP)?

05 Jun
June 5, 2017

The Background: Nearly 50% of patients in the U.S. with cirrhotic liver disease develop ascites over a 10-year period of observation, placing them at risk for developing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) (Runyon 2012). It is estimated that 12-25% of patients with ascites in the ED will have spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) but the classic triad of […]

What’s Your Drug Shortage Plan: Part II

01 Jun
June 1, 2017

Many drugs critical to patient management are showing up on national shortages (most pertinent to the ED list below).  Is your institution feeling the effects?  Do you have a drug shortage plan? In this post we will cover potential alternatives to combat drug shortages for the following medications: Sodium Bicarbonate Promethazine Rocuronium

What’s Your Drug Shortage Plan: Part I

29 May
May 29, 2017

Many drugs critical to patient management are showing up on national shortages (most pertinent to the ED list below).  Is your institution feeling the effects?  Do you have a drug shortage plan? In this post we will cover potential alternatives to combat drug shortages for the following medications: Atropine Calcium Chloride Calcium Gluconate Dextrose 50% Epinephrine […]

Acute Salicylate Toxicity, Mechanical Ventilation, and Hemodialysis

25 May
May 25, 2017

Background: Salicylates are common substances that can be purchased over the counter. They are readily available, and in the setting of an overdose, can be fatal [1]. Initially, as salicylates are metabolized, they can induce a respiratory alklalosis. This is then followed by an anion gap metabolic acidosis. Due to the metabolic derangements induced by […]

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