Archive for category: Critical Care

Is Apneic Oxygenation Overhyped with Scott Weingart

04 Apr
April 4, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketWelcome back to the April 2016 edition of REBELCast. For this episode I was lucky enough to get Scott Weingart on the show to talk to us about all things Apneic Oxygenation (ApOx). ApOx is a concept that has been around for some time in the operating room literature, but only […]

Beyond ACLS: Pre-Charging the Defibrillator

24 Mar
March 24, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketPost Written By: Sam Ghali (Twitter: @EM_RESUS) In cardiac arrest care there has been a lot of focus over the years on limiting interruptions in chest compressions during CPR. In fact, this concept has become a major focus of the current AHA Guidelines. Why? Because we know interruptions are […]

Sepsis 3.0

24 Feb
February 24, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketBackground: Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is something that has been beat into the heads of medical students, residents, fellows, and all physicians in general. However, the derivation of SIRS occurred in 1991, where the focus was on the then-prevailing inflammatory response of the host immune system. In 2001, […]

Should we be Using Apneic Oxygenation (ApOx) in the ED?

08 Feb
February 8, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketBackground: Tracheal intubation is a procedure that is often performed in the ED on patients in critical condition. Because of this, there is the potential for complications such as hypoxemia, hypotension, dysrhythmias, aspiration, and cardiac arrest. Apneic Oxygenation (ApOx) is a concept first explored decades ago in the anesthesia […]

Cardiocerebral Resuscitation: Hands-Only CPR

21 Jan
January 21, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketOne of the major reasons contributing to dismal survival rates in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is the lack of bystander initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Even though the majority of OHCA is witnessed, only 1 in 5 patients will receive bystander initiated CPR [1].  Survey studies have shown that bystanders […]

Classic Journal Review: The OPALS Study

14 Jan
January 14, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit Pocket The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study Background: Sudden cardiac arrest is common and, obviously, very bad. In the US, there are about 500,000 cardiac arrests each year. About half of these cardiac arrests are OHCA and the survival rate is pretty poor. The most recent survival […]

The Role of TEE in Cardiac Arrest

04 Jan
January 4, 2016

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketBackground: Sudden cardiac arrest has very poor outcomes; less than 11% of patients in cardiac arrest in the Emergency Department survive to discharge from the hospital. The management of cardiac arrest is algorithmic because providers have limited tools at their disposal and limited knowledge of the patient’s past medical […]

December 2015 All Cardiology REBELCast

10 Dec
December 10, 2015

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketWelcome to the December 2015 REBELCast, where Swami, Matt, and I are going to tackle a couple of topics in the world of Cardiology and Critical Care. First of all, we all know that the optimal treatment for STEMI is getting the patient to the cardiac catheterization lab, and time […]

November 2015 REBELCast: All Vascular Access Episode

12 Nov
November 12, 2015

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketWelcome to the November 2015 REBELCast, where Swami, Matt, and I are going to tackle a couple of topics in the world of Vascular Access. Peripheral intravenous (PIV) access is one of the most common procedures we perform in the emergency department (ED) and central venous catheter (CVC), although decreasing […]

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Myths

02 Nov
November 2, 2015

Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Reddit PocketRecently, I was asked to give a lecture to both my residents and nurses at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) on some common DKA myths. Now this topic was originally covered by my good friend Anand Swaminathan on multiple platforms and I did ask his permission […]

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