Archive for category: Critical Care

SUP-ICU: Ending the Confusion About Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis in ICU. So I Don’t Give it Right, or do I?

07 Jan
January 7, 2019

Background: Stress related gastrointestinal mucosal damage is a commonly encountered problem in the critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The incidence ranges from 0.6-7% and is decreasing partly due to aggressive resuscitation strategies and focus on early enteral feeding1. Damage to the mucosal integrity occurs in conditions associated with increased inflammation and reduced […]

Early Sepsis Screening in the Emergency Department

10 Dec
December 10, 2018

Background Information: Sepsis is a complex syndrome frequently encountered in the ED. This infection-triggered, multifaceted disorder of life-threatening organ dysfunction is due to the body’s dysregulated response to pathologic and biochemical abnormalities.2-4 There has been significant debate regarding the use of clinical decision tools such as Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) and quick Sepsis-related Organ Failure […]

Delirium in Critical Illness: Haloperidol vs Ziprasidone?

26 Nov
November 26, 2018

Background Information: Delirium is defined as an acute disorder of consciousness which can occur in up to 80% of mechanically ventilated ICU patients.1-5 This acute cognitive dysfunction is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased mortality, longer periods of mechanical ventilation and long-term cognitive impairment compared to patients without delirium.4-8  Haloperidol, remains one of the most commonly used […]

Approach to the Critically Ill Child: Shock

15 Oct
October 15, 2018

If you mainly treat adults or both adults and children like me, then you have probably heard the (very annoying) quote, “kids are not just small adults”, and so I won’t say it again. Well, I guess I just did, but at least I wont stop at this quote, but attempt to explain how kids […]

Accidental Hypothermia

08 Oct
October 8, 2018

Definition: Accidental hypothermia is an unintentional core body temperature of < 35°C when heat loss to surroundings is greater than heat generation Most frequent cause is environmental exposure Patient with impaired thermoregulation can develop hypothermia in relatively warm environments Elderly, underlying illness, trauma, intoxication, or malnutrition (Brown 2012)