Archive for category: Critical Care

Episode 34 – The Death of Mechanical CPR (mCPR)?

23 Mar
March 23, 2017

Background: The two most important things that we can do in cardiac arrest to improve survival and neurologically intact outcomes is high quality CPR, with limited interruptions and early defibrillation. In the case of the former, the 2015 AHA/ACC CPR updates recommended a compression rate of 100 -120/min, a depth of 2 – 2.4in, allowing full […]

The Benefit of Lung Protective Ventilation in the ED Should be LOV-ED

13 Mar
March 13, 2017

Background: Intubation and mechanical ventilation are commonly performed ED interventions and although patients optimally go to an ICU level of care afterwards, many of them remain in the ED for prolonged periods of time. It is widely accepted that the utilization of lung protective ventilation reduces ventilator-associated complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Additionally, […]

Fluid Responsiveness and the Six Guiding Principles of Fluid Resuscitation

27 Feb
February 27, 2017

Background: Fluid resuscitation is a crucial aspect of emergency and critical care. Since the advent of the concept of early goal-directed therapy, we have placed a huge emphasis on aggressive fluid resuscitation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. From EGDT to PROCESS/ARISE/PROMISE to Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, we have seen a shift in how fluid […]

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of Proton Pump Inhibitors in UGIB

23 Feb
February 23, 2017

Upper gastrointestinal bleeding remains a common reason for emergency department visits and is a major cause of morbidity, mortality, and medical care costs. Often when these patients arrive, the classic IV-O2-Monitor is initiated and hemodynamic stability is assessed. One of the next steps often performed includes the initiation of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The ultimate question however […]

February 2017 REBEL Cast: The All Hyperoxia Edition

20 Feb
February 20, 2017

Background: Many providers and health care workers place oxygen on patients as a way to overcome hypoxemia or for patient comfort. Also in STEMI patients, many of us have learned the mnemonic “MONA” to remember the treatments for acute coronary syndrome. MONA stands for morphine, oxygen, nitroglycerin, and aspirin. It is however important to remember […]

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