Archive for category: Airway Management

Turn it (All the Way) Up: Flush Rate O2 for Pre-Oxygenation

14 Sep
September 14, 2017

Background: There has been a lot of buzz recently about the importance of pre-oxygenation in emergency airway management.  The recent publication of the ENDAO trial [2], a randomized clinical trial of ApOx vs no ApOx also emphasized this point.  In the review article accompanying this trial by John Sackles [3] he brought up the point […]

The ENDAO Trial: Is Apneic Oxygenation a Futile Intervention in ED RSI?

21 Aug
August 21, 2017

Background: One of the most feared complications associated with rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is hypoxemia ultimately leading to cardiac arrest.  The FELLOW Trial, a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated no difference in hypoxemia rates between patients that received apneic oxygenation and those that did not (i.e. “usual practice”) in the ICU.  What many forget about […]

Apneic Oxygenation (ApOx): A Review of the Evidence in Critical Care & Emergency Medicine

17 Jul
July 17, 2017

Background: Apneic oxygenation (ApOx) is the passive flow of oxygen into the alveoli during apnea.  This passive movement occurs due to the differential rate between alveolar oxygen absorption and carbon dioxide excretion producing a mass flow of gas from the upper respiratory tract into the lungs.  Another important component of this maneuver is maintaining a […]

Peri-Intubation Anaphylaxis

08 May
May 8, 2017

Background: Peri-operative anaphylaxis is an unexpected complication of intubation. The major life threat in anaphylaxis is typically loss of airway, however profound hypotension and circulatory collapse are still possible life threats even in the setting of a protected airway. Peri-operative anaphylaxis is considered an important enough issue to be the subject of the NAP 6 (National Audit […]

In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The First 15 Minutes

27 Apr
April 27, 2017

Background: Over the past few years there has been a shift in cardiac arrest from the mantra of ABC (Airway, Breathing, Circulation) to CAB (Circulation, Airway, Breathing).  There has been increased emphasis on circulation and a de-emphasis of airway management in cardiac arrest.  Physiologically, this makes sense as the only two interventions in cardiac arrest […]

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