Author Archive for: srrezaie

Is the Future of Non-Invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring Here and Ready for Primetime?

06 Apr
April 6, 2017

Background: Many physicians struggle with monitoring accurate continuous blood pressures, cardiac output, and response to fluids in patient resuscitation. Also, due to the invasive nature of most methods presently available (i.e. arterial lines, etc) few patients get this monitoring. Ultrasound has been an amazing addition to our armamentarium, but many, I am sad to say, still don’t feel comfortable with this modality. Recently, finger cuff, non-invasive technology was brought to my attention by Bob Frolichstein (Twitter: @frolichstein), one of my colleagues in San Antonio, TX. Specifically, it has been stated that, finger cuff technology, allows hemodynamic monitoring with both BP and CO continuously available in patients without the need for an arterial line. Read more →

Urinary Retention: Rapid Drainage or Gradual Drainage to Avoid Complications?

04 Apr
April 4, 2017

Background: The treatment of urinary retention is pretty straightforward; place either a Foley catheter or suprapubic catheter to decompress the bladder.  What is less clear, and more often debated, is if we need to clamp the catheter after 200 – 1000mLs of urine output or just allow complete drainage.  Historic teaching has been to do intermittent volume drainage to avoid complications such as hematuria, circulatory collapse, and worsening renal failure.  I distinctly remember being taught this as a resident, but not sure that I ever evaluated the literature until recently.  Read more →

Episode 35 – Non Operative Treatment of Appendicitis (NOTA)

03 Apr
April 3, 2017

Background: Historically the treatment of uncomplicated appendicitis has been appendectomy. The first appendectomy performed dates back to 1735 done by Claudius Amyand. Appendectomy has been the standard treatment for acute appendicitis every since Charles McBurney described it in 1889. However, studies have shown that an antibiotic first strategy may be feasible without increased risk of perforation, sepsis, and/or death.  This other approach is called NOTA (Non-Operative Treatment of Appendicitis).  Past RCTs were from Europe and this is the first NIH grant study to question this in the US. Antibiotic first strategies are used for uncomplicated diverticulitis, but have not been used in uncomplicated appendicitis. Several reasons why this strategy may be preferred include fewer complications, less pain, and less disability than an appendectomy first strategy.  There have been a couple of systematic reviews on the issue of NOTA that came to different conclusions (Varadhan et al. BMJ 2012 and Kirby et al. J of Infection 2015). To date, no US randomized trial has evaluated an antibiotics-first approach in uncomplicated appendicitis until now. Read more →

Diabetic Gastroparesis Needs HUGS

30 Mar
March 30, 2017

Background: Anyone practicing in emergency medicine has taken care of a patient with diabetic gastroparesis.  Although, it is not a sexy topic to discuss, nor a disease process associated with significant mortality, it is associated with decreased quality of life, and increased resource utilization due to frequent hospitalization.  Furthermore, opioid analgesia, can further decrease gastric emptying and therefore worsen symptoms of abdominal pain and nausea/vomiting. Haloperidol possesses antiemetic and analgesic properties, which may be one of the reasons this medication could work in diabetic gastroparesis.  The authors of this paper quite ingeniously entitled their study: Haloperidol Undermining Gastroparesis Symptoms (HUGS). Read more →

Is Fever the New Hotness in Sepsis?

28 Mar
March 28, 2017

Background: With the introduction of sepsis 3.0, came the quick sepsis related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. The purpose of this score is supposed to be a bedside tool to help predict which patients are at the greatest risk of poor outcomes.  There are three components to this score: Low systolic blood pressure (≤100mmHg), high respiratory rate (22 breaths per minute), and altered mental status (Glasgow coma scale <15).  Interestingly, nowhere in this score is fever. Read more →

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