Author Archive for: robbryant13

How to Call a Consult

17 Mar
March 17, 2016

How to Call a ConsultWhen on shift in the ED we spend more time with a phone in our hand than a laryngoscope. Despite this, we spend a lot more time finessing our laryngoscopy skills than the way we call our consults. Calling an efficient and effective consult / admit can greatly improve our on-shift flow, and therefore happiness. The rest of this post will focus on the art of how to call a consult. Read more →

More Dogma: Epinephrine in Digital Nerve Blocks

03 Sep
September 3, 2015

Digital Nerve BlocksYou are working as an EM resident and have just evaluated a patient with a right long finger DIP joint dislocation. You perform a digital nerve block with 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and go to present to your attending before attempting the reduction. Your attending, on hearing about the epinephrine use goes berserk, and says “don’t you know that you shouldn’t use epi in fingers, noses, ears and toes?”.

When confronted with this situation we all like to have a one stop valid literature review to produce that validates our practice. Several social media authors have weighed in on this topic, however blogs sometimes don’t cut it for those unfamiliar with the current quality of peer reviewed online content.

The use of epinephrine in digital nerve blocks has been shown to increase duration of action for the anesthetic, and to allow the avoidance of bupivacaine, thereby decreasing the pain of the injection. (REBEL flashback) Read more →

Post Intubation Sedation for Pregnant Patients

10 Aug
August 10, 2015

Post Intubation Sedation in Pregnant Patients

You have just intubated a seizing eclamptic woman who is 34 weeks pregnant. As she is being prepped for transfer to the OB unit for an emergent C-section your nurse asks you what medications you would like for post intubation analgesia and sedation.

You have limited recollection of whether Propofol crosses the placenta, and have legitimate concerns about Fentanyl’s chances of producing a ‘floppy baby’ for the OB team on delivery.

The literature on the most appropriate post intubation analgesia / sedation package for late pregnancy patients is limited. The agents we are the most familiar with in the emergency department for post intubation sedation and analgesia are Fentanyl and Propofol. One reliable mantra for post intubation analgesia and sedation is ‘Fentanyl is the sauce, and Propofol is the oregano’, it would be great to be able to apply this mantra to the pregnant population also.

Read more →

Beyond ACLS: CPR, Defibrillation, and Epinephrine

23 Jul
July 23, 2015

Beyond ACLS - CPR, Defibrillation, & EpiAdvanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) provides a well structured framework for those who resuscitate infrequently. There is room to move beyond the algorithm to potentially provide better care for our patients for those who resuscitate frequently. I will describe some tweaks to the way CPR, defibrillation, and medications are delivered in the arrests I manage. Read more →

Skin Anesthesia: Lidocaine vs Bupivacaine +/- Epinephrine

23 Apr
April 23, 2015

 

Skin AnesthesiaWhen selecting a local anesthetic agent for skin wounds I have historically been taught to use lidocaine to provide a faster onset, and to use bupivacaine for a longer duration of action.

It can be time consuming to find 0.5% Bupivacaine with epinephrine and 2% Lidocaine with Epinephrine to produce a final mixture of 1% Lidocaine and 0.25% Bupivacaine with Epinephrine.

  • If there is no difference in effect between these agents time could be saved when drawing up local anesthetics.

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Lidocaine + Bupivacaine vs Bupivacaine Alone for Digital Nerve Blocks

09 Apr
April 9, 2015

Digital Nerve BlocksWhen I first learned digital nerve blocks in the late 1990’s I was taught to mix Lidocaine and Bupivacaine 50/50 to provide faster onset (Lidocaine) and a longer duration of action (Bupivacaine). My use of two agents for digital nerve blocks was recently questioned by one of my colleagues.

Any time additional medications are drawn up into a syringe there is opportunity for error, and there is additional time added to the procedure. A review of the (limited) literature will try to answer the following questions:

  1. Does the addition of Lidocaine to Bupivacaine decrease the time to onset of anesthesia?
  2. Does the addition of Lidocaine to Bupivacaine decrease the pain of injection?
  3. Does the use of Lidocaine with Epinephrine prolong the duration of digital block long enough to obviate the need for Bupivacaine?

Read more →

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